A “Grand Bargain” – Massachusetts Enacts Paid Medical and Family Leave

Posted on: June 29, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

Governor Charlie Baker signed a bill on June 28 making Massachusetts the seventh jurisdiction to enact paid family and medical leave (PFML).  The paid leave provisions are part of a so-called Grand Bargain between the state legislature and voters that was designed to keep several voter initiatives off the November ballot. 

Here are some key provisions:

Funding.  The benefits will be funded at an initial rate of 0.63% of employee’s average weekly wage (to be adjusted annually):

  • The premium for medical leave (employee’s own serious health condition)
    will be paid 40% by the employee and 60% by the employer
  • The employee pays 100% of the premium for family leave
  • The premium has not (yet) been apportioned between medical leave
    and family leave

Premium contributions.  Employers and employees must begin making premium contributions July 1, 2019.

Paid leave benefits available.  Paid leave benefits for all leave reasons except family member serious health condition begin on January 1, 2021.  Paid leave benefits to care for a family member with a serious health condition begin on July 1, 2021.

Leave reasons.  Leave reasons mirror those of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (which will run concurrently in most cases):  Employee’s serious health condition, family member’s serious health condition, bonding with anew child, family military exigencies, and care for a seriously ill or injured service member.

Benefit amount.  Benefits are paid based on a percentage of an employee’s wages, with a cap of $850 weekly.

Leave duration.  Leave durations in a 12-month period are up to:

  • 20 weeks for medical leave (an employee’s own serious health condition)
  • 12 weeks of family leave (care of a family member with a serious health condition, bonding, or military exigencies)
  • 26 weeks to care for a seriously ill or injured service member
  • Aggregate maximum of 26 weeks in a 12-month period for all leave reasons

Voluntary plan.  Employers can meet obligations through the state plan or through a private plan(s) for medical and/or family leave that offer benefits at least as beneficial to employees as the state plan

Matrix will administer this leave law for clients: Watch this space for a more detailed summary of the new law in the next day or two. 

Existing PFML laws.  California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island already have paid family and medical leave laws in effect.  In addition, Washington State’s PFML law will require premium payments starting January 1, 2019, and paid leave benefits starting January 1, 2020.   You can check out our prior summaries about Washington State here and hereWashington D.C. is next in the wings with premium payments starting July 1, 2019, and paid leave benefits starting July 1, 2020.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.

“Because I Said So!” – Following the FMLA Late Certification Rule

Posted on: May 11, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

Employers now know that they have to follow FMLA regulations “because I said so!”  That was the declaration from Helen Applewhaite, DOL Branch Chief for FMLA, in a moment of levity when I asked why employers had to follow a particular FMLA regulation that I called “nonsensical” and another person called “goofy” (well, we were in Disney territory, after all!).

Last week I was in Orlando for the annual Compliance Conference hosted by the Disability Management Employer Coalition.  I had the honor to co-present a plenary session with Helen Applewhaite entitled FMLA Check-Up:  Red Flags and DOL Recommendations.  After hours of discussion, Helen and I identified 3 categories of issues that the DOL observes employers struggle with:  notifications and communications between employers and employees; recertifications; and protection of the employee’s right to FMLA leave.  Here is an issue we covered in our presentation: 

The late certification rule:  Are you familiar with the late cert rule?  I know from working with Matrix clients that this rule is often unknown to or misunderstood by employers.  Here’s the situation:  An employee fails to return his completed Certification of Health Care Provider within the 15 days allowed by the regulations (or longer if allowed by the employer).  A certification is ultimately provided that supports the requested leave.  Any time off taken for the requested leave reason must be handled by the employer as follows:

  1. Approve FMLA leave during the 15-day period after the certification was requested
  2. Approve FMLA leave during the period that begins with the date of receipt of the certification
  3. Approve or deny FMLA leave during the interim period.

Example:  Terry requests FMLA leave to care for his elderly mother who has a serious health condition.  On June 1, Terry’s employer (or Matrix!) provides Terry with all the required FMLA notices and information, including  Certification of Health Care Provider (CHCP), advising Terry that he must return the CHCP within 15 days (by June 16).  Terry immediately starts taking 1-2 days off per week to care for his mother.  He does not return the completed CHCP until July 1.  The CHCP supports Terry’s usage, saying his mother will need Terry’s care up to 2 days per week.  In this scenario:

  1. Terry’s employer must approve any absences Terry took from June 1 through June 16.
  2. It must approve any covered absences from July 1 going forward.
  3. Terry’s employer has the option whether to approve or deny any leave days taken in the
    interim period from June 17 through June 30.

The late cert rule is found in the FMLA regulations at 29 C.F.R. § 825.313  

Pings for Employers. 

As always with the FMLA, there are related issues for consideration by employers:

  • Adopt a uniform policy regarding whether or not to approve absences that occur in the interim period. Approaching the decision on a case-by-case basis is not only inefficient, but creates a risk of perceived or actual unfairness or discrimination. 
  • Before denying any absences in the interim period, be sure to check with the employee as to whether there are extenuating circumstances that excuse the employee’s late certification. The regulation requires this.
  • If there are no extenuating circumstances and the employer’s policy is to deny FMLA coverage for the interim absences, then the employer can impose discipline in accordance with its attendance policy for those absences.
  • If a certification is never received, the leave is not FMLA protected.
  • If the late certification has deficiencies, follow the correct processes with regard to incomplete or insufficient certs (written notice to employee of deficiencies and 7 days to cure) or for authentication or clarification. See FMLA regulations 29 C.F.R. § 825.305(c) and 825.307. If you ultimately get a satisfactory certification, the leave should be approved as of the date the late but deficient cert was received (plus the initial 15 days).

Discipline that has been imposed for absences that appear unexcused because a certification has not yet been received should be rescinded with respect to any now-FMLA-protected absences.  The tough question is what to do if the employee has been terminated for unexcused absences and then the late certification comes in.  Consult your employment counsel on this one!

Don’t Miss It: THE 2018 DMEC FMLA/ADA EMPLOYER COMPLIANCE CONFERENCE

Posted on: April 24, 2018 0

Join your peers and prepare to confidently tackle your organization’s FMLA/ADA challenges at the 2018 DMEC FMLA/ADA Employer Compliance Conference, Apr. 30-May 3, in Orlando!

This year, Matrix Absence Management is a National Sponsor and I have the privilege of facilitating four sessions! I would love for you to join me and my colleagues at any or all of the below:

Monday, April 30 12:00 pm -2:00 pm
Liability Alert! HR and Supervisor Ethical Missteps:

This session will highlight real ADA and FMLA cases to help you gain a deeper understanding of ethical pitfalls in managing leaves and disabilities, such as misplaced benevolence, relying on stereotypes, what you ask, and how you communicate. Throughout, you will learn best practices to promote ethical ideals.  Join Marti Cardi, Vice President, Product Compliance, Matrix Absence Management, Inc. and Jaclyn Kugell, Partner, Morgan, Brown and Joy, LLP

Monday, April 30 4:30 pm -5:30 Preconference Wrap-Up: Ask the Experts!

Join me and other presenters  as we wrap up the first day of sessions with a chance to ask questions of our experts on the topics covered during the afternoon preconference workshops.

Wednesday, May 2 9:00 am -10:00 am
DOL Red Flags in FMLA Investigations:

Helen Applewhaite, DOL Branch Chief for FMLA will headline in this sessionto help you to identify red flags that could reveal issues with your practices and policies.  I will bring in the practical advice on how you can proactively address these issues to stay in the clear and – occasionally perhaps – will disagree with Ms. Applewhaite and the DOL.

Wednesday, May 2 4:15 pm-5:15 pm
Roundtable Mental Health in the Workplace – The Do’s, Don’ts, and Shoulds:

Join your peers for a small-group discussion and  bring your questions about how to manage mental-health claims in the workplace under the ADA and FMLA:  performance and conduct issues, obtaining medical information, requiring counseling as a condition of continued employment . . .


These sessions with be equally engaging and enlightening, and offer true real-world examples you can put into practice (with the help of Matrix Absence Management, of course).  I hope you decide to join us but if not, stay tuned for my recap of the conference.

To learn more about the 2018 DMEC FMLA/ADA Employer Compliance Conference and to download the full program click here:  http://dmec.org/conferences-and-events/compliance-conference/.   

Just when you thought you might be getting the hang of New York Paid Family Leave…

Posted on: March 12, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

The New York state legislature introduced a bill proposing to expand the coverage of paid leave.  See NY S 7723.  As with so much of the NY PFL law and regulations, the proposed bill – if enacted as is – will add more complications and conflicts.  Here’s what is in the bill:

PROVISION

COMMENTS – IF PASSED
Adds as a covered leave reason, matters related to being victim of domestic or sexual violence:

Medical attention, attending counseling sessions, seeking legal assistance, attendance in court proceedings, communicating with an attorney, relocating to a permanent or temporary residence.

This leave will create a category under Paid Family Leave for which the employee can obtain paid leave for personal medical needs.  An employee’s own medical condition is otherwise excluded from PFL coverage due to the availability of disability leave insurance
Available only for employee as victim, not for a family member as a victim.  Almost all existing laws granting leaves for victims of domestic violence and similar crimes provide time off if either the employee or a specified family member is the victim.  The limitation to the employee only is unusual and we might expect to see an amendment in this regard.

 

Employee can use only 2 weeks of paid PFL (out of the 8, 10, or 12 weeks of total PFL entitlement) for the new leave reason, but can also use 2 additional weeks unpaid, and the unpaid weeks have the same PFL protections. The bill provides an employee with 2 additional weeks of leave for matters related to domestic violence (but unpaid).  For example, in 2018 an employee could take 6 paid weeks to care for a family member, 2 paid weeks for matters relating to being a victim of domestic violence, and 2 weeks unpaid for the same – a total of 10 job-protected weeks off, although for all other reasons NY PFL is limited to 8 weeks in 2018.
Benefits are paid at 67% of employee’s average weekly wage, not to exceed 67% of state average weekly wage.  This is an odd provision – why not just follow the same phase-in of PFL percentage benefits over the next 3 years?

 

As you can see, the proposed bill would create some administration challenges, such as tracking the 2-week limitation of PFL for domestic violence reasons and the 2 additional weeks of unpaid but job-protected leave.  As drafted the bill will also require employers to pay different benefit percentages for early years based on leave reason until the benefit percentage for all leave reasons reaches 67% in 2021.  This bill, if passed, will go into effect on the January 1 following passage – so likely January 1, 2019. We hope for some amendments before passage!

The FMLA is 25!

Posted on: February 2, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE

Happy Birthday!  Monday February 5 marks 25 years since the Family and Medical Leave Act was signed into law.  I was in private practice when the law passed, and I recall an associate with our law firm presented a summary of the new law.  My thought was, “This will never amount to anything.”  So much for my predictive talents!  Who knew that 25 years later the FMLA would be such a big part of my job every day and such a challenge for employers?  The law and regulations have gone through 2 major revisions since enactment, adding things like 26 weeks to care for an ill or injured service member and special rules for flight crews. 

If you want to learn more about this milestone event, including a “Thunderclap” scheduled for 1:00 EST on Monday, check out this page on the website for the National Partnership for Women & Families:  25th anniversary of the FMLA activities.

I also want to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our clients.  You put your trust in Matrix to manage FMLA and state leave requests for your employees and we strive to live up to that trust. 

Matrix can help!
Remember, in addition to our FMLA and state leave of absence services, we also manage ADA accommodation requests, disability claims, workers’ compensation, state paid family leaves, and more.  For information contact your account manager or send us an email at ping@matrixcos.com.