KENTUCKY PASSES LAW REQUIRING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR PREGNANT EMPLOYEES

Posted on: May 14, 2019 0

By Gail Cohen, Director Employment Law & Compliance

May 14, 2019

 

On April 9, 2019, the Governor of Kentucky signed Senate Bill 18, making it the latest state to pass legislation requiring employers, absent undue hardship, to grant reasonable accommodation(s) to employees with “limitations” as a result of pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions. The Kentucky Pregnant Worker’s Accommodations Act (“KPWA”), takes effect June 27, 2019, and applies to employers with fifteen or more employees in the state.

Let’s break it down:

What is a “Limitation” as a Result of Pregnancy, Childbirth or Related Condition? The KPWA does not use the term disability or disabled by pregnancy, etc. as do many state laws in effect. For that matter, normal pregnancy is not a disability under the ADA. The term “limitation” is not defined by the Act but appears to indicate broader coverage than the ADA. Therefore, Kentucky employers should engage in the interactive discussion with regard to the KPWA, even if the nature and duration of the employee’s “limitations” and condition would not otherwise require doing so under the ADA.

What Are Reasonable Accommodation(s)? The act provides a nonexclusive list of potential reasonable accommodations, including:

  • frequent or longer break times;
  • time off to recover from childbirth;
  • acquiring or modifying equipment;
  • seating;
  • temporary transfer to a less strenuous or less hazardous job;
  • job restructuring, light duty, and/or modified work schedule;
  • and a private space (that is not a bathroom) in which to express breast milk.

What about Undue Hardship? The KPWA provides for an employer to decline to provide accommodation if doing so poses an “undue hardship” and includes the traditional types of factors we have seen with similar statutes, i.e. significant difficulty or expense given the size and financial resources of the organization. In addition to those traditional factors, the KPWA provides for additional factors when an employee requests accommodation for her pregnancy, childbirth, etc. For example, the duration of the requested accommodation, and whether similar accommodations are required by policy to be made (or have been made) for other employees for any reason. The latter factor, of course, should look familiar to any employer who knows and complies with the federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

Unlawful Employment Practices. Absent undue hardship, the KPWA rules failing to make reasonable accommodation(s) as unlawful employment practices. Like many other state pregnancy accommodation laws, Kentucky’s prohibits requiring an employee to take a leave of absence if another reasonable accommodation can be provided and requires the employer and employee to engage in a timely, good faith and interactive process to determine effective, reasonable accommodations.

Employer Posting and Notice Requirements. Employers are required to conspicuously post notice of an employee’s right to, among other things, reasonable accommodations for pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions. Employers are also required to provide written notice to new employees when they begin employment and to existing employees within thirty days of the Act’s effective date, June 27, 2019.

Want to learn more?

Join Matrix Radar authors Marti Cardi and Gail Cohen for a practical discussion of the various state laws providing protections for pregnant employees and new parents, and a review of the EEOC’s focus on employers who get it wrong. The webinar, sponsored by the DMEC, will take place June 18, 2019 at 12 noon Eastern (9 AM Pacific). Click here for more information and to register.

 

Matrix can help!  At Matrix Absence Management, we administer FMLA, state leaves, the ADA, and related company policies for employers every day, day in and day out.  If you would like more information contact us at ping@matrix.com or through your Account Manager.