Just when you thought you might be getting the hang of New York Paid Family Leave…

Posted on: March 12, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

The New York state legislature introduced a bill proposing to expand the coverage of paid leave.  See NY S 7723.  As with so much of the NY PFL law and regulations, the proposed bill – if enacted as is – will add more complications and conflicts.  Here’s what is in the bill:

PROVISION

COMMENTS – IF PASSED
Adds as a covered leave reason, matters related to being victim of domestic or sexual violence:

Medical attention, attending counseling sessions, seeking legal assistance, attendance in court proceedings, communicating with an attorney, relocating to a permanent or temporary residence.

This leave will create a category under Paid Family Leave for which the employee can obtain paid leave for personal medical needs.  An employee’s own medical condition is otherwise excluded from PFL coverage due to the availability of disability leave insurance
Available only for employee as victim, not for a family member as a victim.  Almost all existing laws granting leaves for victims of domestic violence and similar crimes provide time off if either the employee or a specified family member is the victim.  The limitation to the employee only is unusual and we might expect to see an amendment in this regard.

 

Employee can use only 2 weeks of paid PFL (out of the 8, 10, or 12 weeks of total PFL entitlement) for the new leave reason, but can also use 2 additional weeks unpaid, and the unpaid weeks have the same PFL protections. The bill provides an employee with 2 additional weeks of leave for matters related to domestic violence (but unpaid).  For example, in 2018 an employee could take 6 paid weeks to care for a family member, 2 paid weeks for matters relating to being a victim of domestic violence, and 2 weeks unpaid for the same – a total of 10 job-protected weeks off, although for all other reasons NY PFL is limited to 8 weeks in 2018.
Benefits are paid at 67% of employee’s average weekly wage, not to exceed 67% of state average weekly wage.  This is an odd provision – why not just follow the same phase-in of PFL percentage benefits over the next 3 years?

 

As you can see, the proposed bill would create some administration challenges, such as tracking the 2-week limitation of PFL for domestic violence reasons and the 2 additional weeks of unpaid but job-protected leave.  As drafted the bill will also require employers to pay different benefit percentages for early years based on leave reason until the benefit percentage for all leave reasons reaches 67% in 2021.  This bill, if passed, will go into effect on the January 1 following passage – so likely January 1, 2019. We hope for some amendments before passage!

New York Makes Paid Family Leave “Notice to Employees” Available

Posted on: November 14, 2017 2

By Marti Cardi, VP-Product Compliance & Gail Cohen, Director-Employment Law/Compliance  

Section 380-7.2.e. of the New York Paid Family Leave law requires employers to post a notice to employees of their rights under the law:

Every covered employer must display or post, and keep posted, a typewritten or printed notice concerning PFL in a form prescribed by the Chair.  The notice must be displayed in plain view where all employees and/or applicants can readily see it.

The state has now issued form PFL-120 for employers to use for this purpose.  It can  be obtained by sending an email to certificates@wcb.ny.gov.

For more information about New York Paid Family Leave, check out our previous blog posts:  October 2017,  October 2017, August 2017, July 2017, May 2017, March 2017, and April 2016.

 

New York Releases Application and Certification Forms for Paid Family Leave

Posted on: October 18, 2017 0

By Marti Cardi, VP-Product Compliance & Gail Cohen, Director-Employment Law/Compliance

They’re out!  The long-awaited, much anticipated application and certification forms for New York Paid Family Leave (NY PFL) have been posted on the NY PFL website HERE!  I have reviewed the forms quickly but there is much to absorb and ponder.  Such as, how many claims management systems will be able to handle an employee’s choice to answer the gender question with the third option, “Not designated/Other”?

As a reminder, NY PFL goes into effect on January 1, 2018, to provide leave to eligible New York employees for three reasons:  to bond with a new child, to care for a family member with a serious health condition, and to attend to matters necessitated by a family member’s active military duty.  Leave starts at 8 weeks in 2018 and tops off at 12 weeks in 2021 and subsequent years.  Similarly, the pay benefit starts at 50% and caps at 67% in 2021.  The benefit is funded by employee payroll contributions.

Watch this blog for further analysis down the road.  In the meantime, we want to share some basics.  Here are the new forms that have been released, and a few notes:

Applying for Paid Family Leave.  New York has provided this “cover page” to accompany each certification form.  It gives very basic instructions on the steps the employee must take to apply for NY PFL for each of the three leave reasons.

Request for Paid Family Leave (Form PFL-1).  This form is not posted as a stand-alone document.  Rather, it accompanies each of the certification forms on the New York website, so no matter the reason for the employee’s leave, the request form is at the same link.  The form is 4 pages and also has 2 pages of instructions (PFL-1 Instructions), which should prove helpful in answering many employee questions about NY PFL and the process.

Bonding Certification (Form PFL-2).  This short form (again, with instructions) provides very helpful direction on the documentation required to support a request for bonding leave, categorized for the birth mother, other parent, foster parent, and adoptive parent.

Release of Personal Health Information Under The Paid Family Leave Law (Form PFL-3 – Release of PHI).  Designed to accompany an employee’s request for leave to care for a family member, this form may be helpful in obtaining the medical information necessary for managing this type of leave.  As an observation, however, Matrix has not had trouble getting FMLA certifications for care of a family member without such a release.

Health Care Provider Certification For Care Of Family Member With Serious health condition (Form PFL-4).  Unlike California and a few other states, New York allows the employer/carrier to obtain the diagnosis of the family member’s health condition.  The form requires the provider to identify his/her credentials and specialty.  The form is 2 pages and the instructions are 1 page.

Military Qualifying Event (Form PFL-5).   Not much to say about this simple form.  It requires the employee to identify for which of the 8 reasons the employee needs leave, and directs the employee to attach supporting documentation.  A companion form (PFL-5-T) is a template for supporting the leave request when other documentation is not available for leave to meet with a 3rd party.

Early Observations – Some Concerns.  As noted above, we have not completed our analysis of these newly released forms, but we have already spotted some potential challenge areas.  For example:

  • Neither the Request for Paid Family Leave (PFL-1) nor the certification form for caring for a family member (PFL-4)
    provides a definition of “serious health condition” In fact, the provider is never required to certify that the employee’s
    family member has a serious health condition.
  • Also, neither the employee nor the provider is required to identify what kind of “care” the employee will be providing
    to the family member. We at Matrix know from experience that many employee requests under the similar FMLA
    provision do not meet the requirement for taking this kind of job-protected leave – and now it will be
    paid. A challenge to verify proper usage, to say the least.
  • The forms refer to the employer’s insurance carrier, but some employers will be self-funded. This could create
    a problem in getting forms properly completed and the correct information provided to the correct party.
    For example, as written, the form for release of a family member’s health information (PFL-3) authorizes release
    to the insurance carrier, but not to the self-funded employer.  While this can be corrected by including the employer’s
    name instead of the carrier’s name, we question how many times this will be done correctly on the
    first go-round.  Can you say “delay”?

For more information about New York Paid Family Leave, check out our previous blog posts: October 2017, August 2017, July 2017, May 2017, March 2017, and April 2016.

MATRIX CAN HELP!

Matrix is honing processes, training teams, and taking other steps to be ready to administer New York Paid Family Leave starting January 1, 2018.  This is a natural extension of our leave, disability, and accommodation management services for employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together.  For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.

New York Releases First Wave of Paid Family Leave Forms

Posted on: October 6, 2017 0

By Marti Cardi, VP-Product Compliance& Gail Cohen, Director-Employment Law/Compliance

 

In something of a stealth move, the New York Workers’ Compensation Board has released three forms for employers’ use in administering and complying with the Paid Family Leave Law that provides benefits starting January 1, 2018.  Those of us who check the NY PFL website daily and are signed up for news feeds received no word, but had to learn of the new forms through back channels.  The released forms include the following:

Employee Paid Family Leave Opt-Out of Benefits (PFL-Waiver, 9-17)

If an employee does not expect to work long enough to qualify for Paid Family Leave (a seasonal worker, for example), the employee may opt out of Paid Family Leave by completing the Waiver of Benefits Form.  Eligibility requires 26 weeks of 20 or more hours per week, or 175 days of work averaging fewer than 20 hours per week, with a covered employer.

This form contains some interesting news.  The employee’s waiver can be revoked by the employee or automatically because the employee has or will work more than the time needed for eligibility.  Per the regulations, the employee then has the obligation to catch up on contributions that would have been made during the eligibility period but for the waiver, but the regulations do not specify how the employer can recoup these amounts.  The form appears to authorize additional deductions from the employee’s pay to catch up for missed contributions:

I also understand if this waiver is revoked (either by me or by a change in my work schedule), my employer may take retroactive deductions for the period of time I was covered by this waiver, and this period of time counts towards my eligibility for paid family leave.  [Emphasis added.]

Employer’s Application for Voluntary Coverage (No Employee Contribution) (PFL-135, 9-17)

Employers exempt from providing mandatory Paid Family Leave may provide voluntary Paid Family Leave by completing PFL-135 (if no employee contribution is required).

Employer’s Application for Voluntary Coverage (Employee Contribution Required) (PFL-136, 9-17)

Employers exempt from providing mandatory Paid Family Leave may provide voluntary Paid Family Leave by completing PFL-136 (if they will be requiring an employee contribution).

The NY PFL regulations also calls for forms for employee use to request NY PFL, and certifications to support leave taken to care for a family member with a serious health condition, for military exigencies, and to bond with a new child due to birth or placement for adoption or foster care.  Employers and insurance carriers still working to get ready for the January 1, 2018, effective date have been begging the WCB for these other forms, which will be critical in getting the information the employer is entitled to for consideration of leave requests.  Employers and carriers are permitted to use their own forms, but clearly it is safest and easiest to use NY-sanctioned forms, especially at the beginning of this uncharted leave law.

The new forms, and additional forms as they are released, can be found at this link: https://www.ny.gov/new-york-state-paid-family-leave/paid-family-leave-employer-and-employee-forms-0

For more information about New York Paid Family Leave, check out our previous blog posts: August 2017, July 2017, May 2017, March 2017, and April 2016.

Hat tip to Marjory Robertson who provided early information about the new forms in an industry NY PFL call group!

 

Tax Implications of New York Paid Family Leave Addressed

Posted on: August 28, 2017 0

By Marti Cardi, VP-Product Compliance &

Gail Cohen, Director-Employment Law/Compliance

 

The state of New York has released much-needed guidance on the tax implications of employee premium contributions and benefits under the state’s new Paid Family Leave (PFL), slated to go into effect on January 1, 2018.  According to the New York Department of Taxation and Finance:

Benefits paid to employees will be taxable non-wage income that must be included in federal gross income.

Taxes will not automatically be withheld from benefits; employees can request voluntary tax withholding.

Premiums will be deducted from employees’ after-tax wages.

Employers should report employee contributions on Form W-2 using Box 14 – State disability insurance taxes withheld.

Benefits should be reported by the State Insurance Fund on Form 1099-G and by all other payers on Form 1099-MISC.

The Department released this guidance upon consideration of applicable state and federal laws and regulations, and after consultation with the federal Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  The Department warns, however, that every employee, employer and insurance carrier should consult with its own tax advisor.

The Department’s Notice can be found here:  https://www.tax.ny.gov/pdf/notices/n17_12.pdf.

We have written about the New York Paid Family Leave law in previous blog posts in July 2017, May 2017, March 2017, and April 2016.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.