MASS-ive developments in Paid Family Medical Leave law

Posted on: March 21, 2019 0

By Marti Cardi, Vice President Product Compliance Gail Cohen, Director Employment Law & Compliance

March 21, 2019

 

Big dates are ahead in Massachusetts relating to its paid family and medical leave program.  The Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) has announced two key developments:

Massachusetts PFML regulations. The second draft of the PFML regulations will be issued on March 29.  You may recall that the first draft was issued on January 23, 2019.  These were a start but many key topics were not addressed.  The DFML conducted over 10 listening sessions around the state, soliciting comments from attendees on the draft regulations.  The DFML also accepted written comments through March 13.

Now the DFML has announced that the next draft of the regulations will be published on March 29, followed by another public comment period. We expect these to be near final due to the extensive outreach the DFML conducted to gather input. Final regulations will be published and effective no later than July 1, 2019.

Private plan applications.  Employers can begin filing private plan applications on April 29, 2019.  The only detail we have been able to find so far is that applications may be filed through MassTaxConnect We have submitted over 20 questions to the DFML to identify information that Matrix and employers will need to know in deciding whether to file for a private plan.  These address application details, approval process and turnaround time, details on the bond requirement, and much more.

Based on our prior communications with key personnel at the DFML, we anticipate that the application process will be more employer-friendly than our experience in Washington.  In fact, there are indications that, unlike Washington State, employers may be able to submit existing plans that meet or exceed the Commonwealth’s requirements rather than designing and submitting a new, Massachusetts-specific plan.

We are currently developing templates for employer-sponsored private plans to satisfy the medical leave benefit, the family leave benefit or both requirements, and will make these available to our Massachusetts clients as soon as they are completely vetted.

Need to catch up? You can read our prior review of the Massachusetts PFML here. Below is a timeline of the Massachusetts PFML journey from inception to launch, as currently represented by DFML.

Matrix has you covered! We’ve been watching for these developments and know employers have many questions that – we are hopeful – will be answered in the next few weeks.  In anticipation, we have scheduled webinars to be held on Tuesday, April 23 and Wednesday, April 24. Both webinars begin at 2:00 PM Eastern time. Click the day you prefer to attend and REGISTER today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

We can help!  At Matrix Absence Management, we administer FMLA, state leaves, the ADA, and related company policies for employers every day, day in and day out.  If you would like more information contact us at ping@matrix.com or through your Account Manager.

Hawaii Enacts Law to Require Analysis for Paid Family Leave

Posted on: July 13, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

Hawaii is moving closer to a paid family leave program with legislation signed by the Governor on July 5.  The law does not enact a PFL law but requires the state Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct an analysis to assist the legislature in determining the most appropriate framework or model for the establishment of paid family leave for the state.

The analysis will include a comparative analysis of other state paid leave models, including temporary disability insurance models. Factors to be considered include scope of coverage; gender equity; ease of making applications or claims; speed of benefit payment; and financial sustainability.  The analysis will also assess cost and other impacts on employers and employees.  The Bureau’s final report must include its findings, recommendations, and proposed legislation, to the legislature no later than September 1, 2019.

Hawaii currently has paid temporary disability benefits for up to 26 weeks per benefit year for an employee’s own disability and an unpaid family leave law that provides up to 4 weeks per calendar year of job-protected unpaid time off.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.

California Updates Its Paid Family Leave Law with a Clean-Up Bill

Posted on: July 12, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

 

NOTE TO READERS:  This topic was originally addressed in this blog on July 12, 2018.  That post sparked some questions about the California Paid Family Leave program that make it appropriate to issue this revised article.  The content of the original post was accurate but is now supplemented with additional information in this version, specifically relating to the two weeks of PTO an employer can require an employee to use before taking California PFL.

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Today’s post is not exactly earth shattering news, but we promise to keep you up to date on developments in leave laws and accommodations.  California has enacted a bill that makes a minor adjustment to the state’s paid family leave program – mostly a “technical correction” really. (CA A 2587)

The state family temporary disability insurance program, also known as the paid family leave program, provides wage replacement benefits to workers who take time off to care for a seriously ill family member or to bond with a minor child within one year of birth or placement of that child.

Existing California law allows an employer to require an employee to use up to 2 weeks of earned but unused vacation time before, and as a condition of, the employee’s initial receipt of paid family leave benefits during any 12-month period. Prior to January 1, 2018, California imposed a 7-day waiting period before employees could begin receiving benefits for a covered absence and the employer could apply that vacation pay to cover the waiting period. The 7-day waiting period for these benefits was eliminated as of January 1, 2018, by a prior law.

This new California law now eliminates the application of vacation leave to the waiting period, consistent with the removal of the 7-day waiting period for these benefits on and after January 1, 2018. After all, you can’t apply the employee’s vacation pay to the 7-day waiting period because there no longer is a 7-day waiting period.  Technically the effective date is January 1, 2019, but as there has been no waiting period since January 1, 2018, there has been nothing to which to apply that accrued vacation.

Employers are still able to require employees to use up to two weeks of accrued vacation or PTO, if available, prior to receipt of PFL benefits.  The use of such accrued paid time off is in addition to the 6 weeks of state or voluntary plan paid family leave benefits, which will follow the 2 weeks of PTO.  The statute refers to use of accrued “vacation” but material from the California Employment Development indicates that this includes an employer’s broader paid time off benefit as well.

Matrix can help!  Matrix is a leading provider of services for administering California State Disability Insurance and Paid Family Leave voluntary programs.  Ping us for more information at ping@matrixcos.com.

A “Grand Bargain” – Massachusetts Enacts Paid Medical and Family Leave

Posted on: June 29, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

Governor Charlie Baker signed a bill on June 28 making Massachusetts the seventh jurisdiction to enact paid family and medical leave (PFML).  The paid leave provisions are part of a so-called Grand Bargain between the state legislature and voters that was designed to keep several voter initiatives off the November ballot. 

Here are some key provisions:

Funding.  The benefits will be funded at an initial rate of 0.63% of employee’s average weekly wage (to be adjusted annually):

  • The premium for medical leave (employee’s own serious health condition)
    will be paid 40% by the employee and 60% by the employer
  • The employee pays 100% of the premium for family leave
  • The premium has not (yet) been apportioned between medical leave
    and family leave

Premium contributions.  Employers and employees must begin making premium contributions July 1, 2019.

Paid leave benefits available.  Paid leave benefits for all leave reasons except family member serious health condition begin on January 1, 2021.  Paid leave benefits to care for a family member with a serious health condition begin on July 1, 2021.

Leave reasons.  Leave reasons mirror those of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (which will run concurrently in most cases):  Employee’s serious health condition, family member’s serious health condition, bonding with anew child, family military exigencies, and care for a seriously ill or injured service member.

Benefit amount.  Benefits are paid based on a percentage of an employee’s wages, with a cap of $850 weekly.

Leave duration.  Leave durations in a 12-month period are up to:

  • 20 weeks for medical leave (an employee’s own serious health condition)
  • 12 weeks of family leave (care of a family member with a serious health condition, bonding, or military exigencies)
  • 26 weeks to care for a seriously ill or injured service member
  • Aggregate maximum of 26 weeks in a 12-month period for all leave reasons

Voluntary plan.  Employers can meet obligations through the state plan or through a private plan(s) for medical and/or family leave that offer benefits at least as beneficial to employees as the state plan

Matrix will administer this leave law for clients: Watch this space for a more detailed summary of the new law in the next day or two. 

Existing PFML laws.  California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island already have paid family and medical leave laws in effect.  In addition, Washington State’s PFML law will require premium payments starting January 1, 2019, and paid leave benefits starting January 1, 2020.   You can check out our prior summaries about Washington State here and hereWashington D.C. is next in the wings with premium payments starting July 1, 2019, and paid leave benefits starting July 1, 2020.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.

Washington State Issues First Phase of Paid Family and Medical Leave Regulations

Posted on: June 5, 2018 0

BY MARTI CARDI, VP-PRODUCT COMPLIANCE & GAIL COHEN, DIRECTOR-EMPLOYMENT LAW/COMPLIANCE

In 2017 Washington State was the fifth state to pass a paid family and medical leave law. 

The law requires employers to provide up to 18 weeks of paid, job-protected leave per 52-week period due to the employee’s own serious health condition, to bond with a new child, to care for a family member with a serious health condition, and for military exigencies.  The benefits are funded by employer and employee payment of premiums.  

Premium payments begin January 1, 2019, and benefits are available starting January 1, 2020.  In the meantime, Washington’s Family Leave Act remains in force to provide employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid job-protected leaves of absence.  We reviewed the new paid family and medical leave law on this blog when it was passed.  Click here  to read our summary.  

On May 29, 2018, the Washington State Employment Security Department released the first of four sets of rules to implement the Paid Family and Medical Leave Program. Rules become effective 31 days after filing.  Topics will be addressed on the following schedule:

 

Phase One Phase Two Phase Three Phase Four
-Premium liability

-Collective bargaining agreements

-Voluntary plans

-Employer responsibilities

-Small business assistance

-Penalties

-Benefits -Appeals
November 2017 – May 2018 April – November 2018 August 2018 – January 2019 January – May 2019

 

Assessing and Collecting Premiums  [ WAC 192-510-010 et.seq.]:  The new regulations contain many details.  Here is a quick summary, with links to the Phase One regulations if you want to read them yourself.  Matrix will provide more detailed guidance in the near future.

Election of coverage and withdrawal of election by self-employed persons and federally-recognized tribes

Determination of wages earned and hours worked for self-employed persons

Effect of employer’s size on liability for premiums and eligibility for small business assistance grants

How the state will assess the size of new employers

Payment of premiums by employer (paid quarterly; due on the last day of the month following the end of the quarter

This regulation states that the payment must include “the premiums owed on all wages subject to premiums during that calendar quarter.” Although not specified, presumably this includes both the employer’s share of the premiums and the amounts withheld from paychecks for the employees’ share.

How “localization” of an employee’s work in Washington is determined for coverage by the law, and when services not localized in Washington are also subject to the law

Collective Bargaining Agreements  [WAC 192-520-010]:

The effect of collective bargaining agreements (CBAs) in effect before October 19, 2017 – the date the law became effective – and those that expire or are reopened or renegotiated on or after that date.

The manner of determining an employee’s hours worked when the qualifying period includes time worked under a CBA and then hours worked after the CBA expires without renewal or renegotiation (and so is then covered by the act).

The effect on employers of having employee populations subject to one or more CBAs and/or employee populations not subject to a CBA.

Voluntary Plans  [WAC 192-530-010 et seq.]

The required features of voluntary plans:

A voluntary plan must provide at least the same or greater benefits than the state benefits with regard to the duration and reasons for leave.

The amount of benefits available must be the same or greater than benefits offered by the state plan.

The premium paid by the employee cannot be any greater than the employee’s premium for the state plan

Submission of plans for state approval:

Voluntary plans must be submitted for approval through a state portal, expected to be available in late summer 2018. There is a $250 filing fee per plan.

A plan must be submitted for re-approved every year for its first three years.

Thereafter, re-approval is not required unless the employer makes changes to the voluntary plan that are not required by law.

Rules regarding payment of benefits on an accelerated schedule:

An employer can agree to offer benefits payments on an accelerated schedule whereby the employee receives the total amount of the anticipated leave benefit over a shorter time period, but not less than one-half the duration of the anticipated leave.

The employee can choose to return to work earlier than planned and does not have to repay the amounts paid in advance for leave time not taken.

Election of voluntary plans for medical and family leave benefits:

An employer can elect to have paid medical and paid family leave both covered by a voluntary plan, or can have a voluntary plan for just one benefit and use the state plan for the other benefit.

Provisions for how to determine employee eligibility for voluntary plan benefits, how to avoid duplication of benefits paid by the state and by a voluntary plan, and what happens when a voluntary plan ends.

Watch this space!  Matrix will continue to monitor Washington’s regulatory activities and report on the new regulations as Phases Two, Three, and Four are issued.  In the meantime, more materials are available on the state’s Employment Security Department website.

Matrix can help!  As always, we are tracking and analyzing developments regarding the Washington Paid Family and Medical Leave Program.  We will be ready well in advance to advise employers on the premiums beginning in 2019 and benefits beginning in 2020.  If you have questions, contact your Account Manager or ping@matrixcos.com.