MASSACHUSETTS PFML UPDATE – NOW WHAT’S GOING ON?

Posted On August 27, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

August 27, 2019

 

There are lots of moving parts in Massachusetts these days, as we get closer to implementation of the commonwealth’s paid family and medical leave (PFML) law. Over time we have published several articles on Massachusetts PFML:  You can take a look back at our overall summary and periodic developments by entering “Massachusetts” in the search box of this page. In the meantime, here’s what’s happening now:

Private Plans – A Quick Reminder

An employer can opt for its employees to be covered by the public PFML plan administered by the Mass DFML – in which case the employer does not need to apply, just submits the required quarterly reporting and employer/employee contributions to the commonwealth.

If an employer prefers to cover its employees through a private plan administered by the employer, or by a TPA or insurance carrier like Matrix and Reliance Standard, the employer must apply to the commonwealth and get its private plan approved. Performance of the private plan is ensured either by posting a bond (self-insured plan) or obtaining private PFML insurance. An employer can elect a private plan for paid family leave, paid medical leave, or both. If it elects a private plan for only one benefit, the other is covered by the DFML’s public plan.

Private Plans and Insurance Policies

On August 22, the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) and the Massachusetts Department of Insurance (DOI) held a joint “listening session” regarding private PFML plans. The goal of the two departments and attendees is to develop a private plan template that is compliant with the Massachusetts PFML and DOI requirements. I was in attendance for Matrix Absence Management, along with several of my colleagues from Matrix’s sister company, Reliance Standard Life Insurance Company. Here are some important takeaways from that meeting:

Prior to the listening session the DFML and DOI distributed a private plan/insurance policy template to attendees. This template had been submitted for consideration by an unnamed insurance carrier. Apparently there is some incorrect buzz in the industry that this is a Massachusetts-sanctioned template. DON’T BE FOOLED! This is not an approved template but was shared solely to start and focus the discussion. In fact, there are many mistakes and omissions in the starter template that make it noncompliant with the PFML law and would require rejection of the plan if submitted for approval as-is.

The DOI and DFML recognize the urgent need to get more guidance to carriers and employers regarding private plans and insurance coverage. It is a huge task. (One department representative stated she wished it were April instead of August.) The departments expressed intent to have a new version of the template, incorporating changes suggested at the listening session, available relatively soon, perhaps by the end of this week. The DOI stated that it would be about 3-4 weeks before a plan template could be approved.

The departments expect to hold another listening session after the release of a revised plan template. We will be certain to attend that meeting.

More Private Plan Information

Remember, there is no deadline to file for approval of a private plan – employers can file at any time and the plan will be effective on the first day of the quarter following approval. However, there is financial incentive to get a private plan approval by December 20. In that case the employer is not required to pay the employee and employee contributions to the commonwealth for the 4th quarter, October-December 2019. Rather, the employer can hold contributions collected from employees to fund its own private plan (benefits or insurance premiums).

Of course, the employer is not required to withhold contributions from employees at all, if it chooses to fund the plan entirely itself.

The DFML clarified at the listening session that an employer can file for approval of a private plan without the actual bond or insurance policy yet in place. Approval of the plan by the DFML will be provisional, subject to further filing of the bond or the policy.

However, the DFML recommends patience and suggests employers wait for more guidance from the departments – especially those employers intending to purchase insurance to pay for the PFML benefits. The DFML advises that it may be better to wait until they provide more information so a more complete package can be submitted.

If an employer does not have approval by December 20, however, it will be required to pay the Q4 employer and employee contributions to the DFML during January 2020.

Employee Notices

While so much is in flux, one solid looming deadline is the requirement to provide PFML notices to employees by September 30, 2019.

Forms and more information are available on the DFML website. These are suggested forms and employers can modify them as needed to reflect their current status as to private or public plan, withholding of employee contributions, etc. If you previously sent out notices that are now inaccurate as to details such as commencement of employee contributions you will need to send an amended notice, which is also available on the DFML website.

And, if you haven’t done so yet, go to that same website to download the PFML poster to hang in your workplace. This posting requirement is already in effect, so do it now! Again, the DFML form poster can be modified to fit your situation.

What are Matrix and Reliance Standard doing?

  • Reliance Standard and Matrix continue in their leadership role in the absence management world.
    Reliance Standard
     has formally announced its intent to underwrite both MA Paid Family and
    Paid
    Medical.
    Whether you are fully insured or self-funded for these programs, we can manage
    your risk and your service experience!
  • Matrix has developed its own private plan template, now updated to be consistent with the
    amendments to the PFML law passed on June 13
    and the final regulations issued by DFML
    effective July 1, 2019. This plan is ready for filing if YOU are ready to move forward, regardless
    of whether you choose to self fund PFML benefits or obtain insurance through Reliance Standard
    .

For those employers choosing to self-fund MA PFML benefits, we can help facilitate sourcing the required bond through our sister company, Tokio Marine HCC.

If your company is interested in the private plan option for Massachusetts PFML, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager now, or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.comAnd stay tuned here for more information about Massachusetts PFML as it develops.

STOP THE PRESSES (AGAIN): MASSACHUSETTS PFML FINAL REGULATIONS AND BOND FORM HAVE ARRIVED

Posted On June 25, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

June 25, 2019

 

Last week the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave issued the final PFML regulations AND the form for the bond required of self-funded private plans.  Here’s the rundown on both.  With the 3-month delay (see our last blog post here) and these 2 developments, I’m hoping things will be quiet in Massachusetts for a while!

Final PFML Regulations

The final regulations were issued on June 17, 2019. I’ve now read them top to bottom and compared them to the March 29, 2019 draft version.  Sad to say, there are not many revisions that help employers, and many unanswered questions remain.  Here are noteworthy changes or additions:

  • Intermittent leave. The definition of “intermittent leave” allows an employer to designate a minimum
    increment of time that can be taken as intermittent leave, up to 4 hours per segment.  458 CMR 2.02.
    It may be tempting to require employees to use time in larger chunks but, as a practical matter, this may
    prove a challenge when MA PFML and FMLA are running concurrently.  FMLA allows intermittent leave
    in increments of no longer than an hour.  29 C.F.R. § 825.205(a).  If the time increments don’t match up,
    the employee will be using the two job-protected leave entitlements at different rates, which can cause
    administrative difficulties.
  • Groups of employees. The final regulations allow an employer to deduct differing percentages from the
    wages of different groups of employees, as long as no employee is assessed more than the statutorily
    allowed amounts per employee.  458 CMR 2.05((5)(d).
  • Definition of “incapacity.” This definition has been clarified and now reads:

“. . . an inability to perform the functions of one’s position, or where the covered individual is a former employee, to perform the functions of one’s most recent position or other suitable employment as that term is defined under M.G.L. c. 151A, § 25(c), due to the serious health condition, treatment therefor, or recovery therefrom.”  458 CMR 2.02.

  • Certification follow-up. In a new provisions, 458 CMR 2.08(5)(g) states:

Where it determines that a certification lacks required information, or is not accurate or authentic, or is otherwise insufficient, the Department may contact the health care provider and require that it verify, supplement, or otherwise amend the information in the certification.

This appears to be a “lite” version of the FMLA procedures an employer can follow when it receives an
incomplete, insufficient, or otherwise questionable certification.  See 29 C.F.R. §§ 825.305(c) and 825.307.
Presumably this will also apply to employers and their TPAs when administering claims under a private plan.

  • 7-day waiting period. An employee will not receive benefits during the first 7 calendar days of leave.
    This 7-day waiting period will count against the total available period of leave in a benefit year. The final
    regulations have added this clarification:  “Where the approved claim involves leave on an intermittent
    or reduced leave schedule, the wait period shall be seven consecutive calendar days, not the aggregate
    accumulation of seven days of leave.” In other words, once an employee takes any increment of leave the
    7-day waiting period starts and is completed after the 7th calendar day, regardless of how many days of
    leave the employee has (or has not) taken during that time.
  • Definition of “child.” Under MA PFML, an employee can take paid leave to care for a child with a serious
    health condition.  The final regulations have modified the definition of child by deleting the provision that
    a child must be either under age 18 or, if age 18 or older, incapable of self-care because of a mental or
    physical disability at the time the leave is to commence.  This has the effect of expanding the family members
    for whom the employee can take PFML, and creates another category (adult child who is not disabled) that
    is not covered by the FMLA.
  • Private plan recordkeeping. A new provision specifically requires employers with an approved private plan to
    retain all reports, information, and records related to the approved plan, including those related to all claims
    for benefits made under the plan, for three years.  The employer must submit this documentation to the
    DFML upon request. 458 CMR 2.07(7) (b)

The final regulations can be found here.

 

The Bond Requirement for Private Plans

The PFML statute requires employers with a self-funded (uninsured) private plan to support their application for approval with a bond from a surety company.   We previously wrote about the bond requirement here.   The DFML has now published the required bond form and filing instructions.  One requirement I don’t recall seeing previously is that the employer must attach a copy of its most recent audited or consolidated financial statement for the previous year.  There is also reference to the “self-insured plan number.” Based on previous communications with the DFML it appears that the employer can designate any number as an identifier for its self-funded PFML plan.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  As noted above, there are still many uncertainties regarding how Massachusetts PFML will actually function.  Matrix will administer Massachusetts PFML for our clients who elect the private plan option.  Rest assured, we will be posing our questions to the DFML so that our clients will receive best in class administrative services. If your company is interested in the private plan option for Massachusetts PFML, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.com

 

MASSACHUSETTS PASSES LIGHTNING BILL TO DELAY SOME PFML DATES--AND, THE FINAL REGULATIONS ARE HERE!

Posted On June 19, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

June 19, 2019

 

In a coordinated move so fast it makes your head spin, the Massachusetts governor and legislature have passed the promised bill to delay by 3 months the start of employer and employee contributions to the paid family and medical leave program, to October 1. The bill, MA S 2255, brings about some other modifications to the PFML law as well. What hasn’t changed is the date for commencement of benefits – still January 1, 2021.

In addition, the final Massachusetts PFML regulations have been posted on the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) website here. The regulations are key to fully understanding and administering the Massachusetts PFML law. The DFML received many comments and suggestions for final revisions, and we will be studying the changes made from the 03-29-2019 draft.

In the interest of getting this article about the statutory delays posted timely, we are not including an analysis of the final regulations yet. Watch this blog for another article shortly.

 

THE CHANGES

Here is the content of the announcement sent by the DFML to Massachusetts employers on June 14, 2019, regarding the delays of prior PFML compliance dates, with Matrix’s observations in italics:

 

Required Withholding Now Starts October 1

“The start date for required PFML contributions is now October 1, 2019. On that date, employers must begin withholding PFML contributions from employee qualifying earnings.  Employers will be responsible for remitting employee and (if applicable) employer contributions for the October 1 to December 31 quarter through MassTaxConnect by January 31, 2020.”

Matrix observations: Remember that (1) employers can elect to cover the employee share of contributions, regardless of whether they choose to use the public plan or a private plan to comply with the law; and (2) employers with a private plan approved by December 20, 2019, don’t have to remit any payments to the DFML. So to say the start date for “required PFML contributions” is now October 1 is a little misleading.

This delay in the start date for contributions may be less of a blessing for some employers than for others, if you have already programmed your payroll system to start the employee paycheck deductions on July 1. Now, any such deductions are not required by the law until October 1 (f at all) and so might be a violation of state or federal wage laws if initiated on July 1. Consult your employment counsel if this is an issue for you.

 

Contribution Rate Change

“The PFML law requires that the Department adjust the contribution rate to offset the shorter period for collections that will result from the three month delay. As a result, the total contribution rate has been adjusted from 0.63% to 0.75% of employee qualifying earnings. This adjustment will ensure that full funding will be in place for the commencement of benefit payments in January 2021.”

Matrix observations: The amendments do not specify how long this adjusted rate will remain in effect, but the law requires the Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) to review and adjust the rate effective each October 1, if needed.

The PFML statute requires the employee to pay 100% of the contribution attributable to family leave and the employee and employer to share the contribution attributable to medical leave on a 40% employee/60% employer split. This has not changed. The DFML advises that the 0.75% will be apportioned as follows:

  • 0.13% to family leave, of which the employee pays all; and
  • 0.62% to medical leave, of which the employee pays not more than 40%

 

You can see a graphic illustration of the new contribution rates on the DFML website.

 

Timeline Extended for Required Employee Notices

“Employers now have until September 30, 2019, to notify all covered individuals of their rights and obligations under PFML. Check the Department website at mass.gov/pfml in the coming days for updated notices to provide to your workforce.”

Matrix observations: What if you have already sent the notices that were previously required by May 31 June 30? The DFML has this guidance on its website:

“If you provided written notices to your workforce prior to the June 14 delay announcement, you will need to provide them with an addendum sheet explaining the updated program dates and contribution rates. This addendum will be provided by DFML during the week of June 17.”

If you haven’t sent the notices yet, just use the new DFML notice forms. You can find the updated notice requirements and templates (and the addendum once available) here.

As an aside, in my communications with the DFML I have confirmed that the poster and the individual notice templates available on the DFML website are examples and can be modified as needed to reflect accurately your own situation, as long as all the notice elements are covered. This will be particularly significant for employers with a private plan or those electing not to withhold contributions from employee paychecks.

 

Timeline Extended for Exemption Applications

“Employers that offer paid leave benefits that are at least as generous as those required under the PFML law may apply to the Department for an exemption from making contributions. Employers will now have until December 20, 2019, to apply for an exemption that will excuse them from the obligation to remit contributions for the full period commencing with the October 1 start date.”

Matrix observations: The exemption referred to here is obtained adopting an approved private plan – one administered by the employer or a by third party such as Matrix or an insurance company rather than the state. See the end of this post for information about private plan assistance Matrix is ready to provide.

If the private plan application is filed by December 20, 2019 (and ultimately approved by the DFML) the employer can avoid paying employee and employer contributions to the state for the period October 1- December 31, 2019. The advantage is retaining those contributions to fund an employer’s own private plan and payment of benefits. Matrix recommends filing in advance of December 20 to ensure plenty of time for approval. Guidance from the DFML about the private plan exemption can be found on the DFML exemption page.

Note that there is no “deadline” to file an application for private plan approval. The DFML will accept filings on a continuous rolling basis, but a plan won’t be in effect until the first day of the quarter following approval, so the employer will have to pay to the state any employee and employer contributions accruing prior to that date. As a result, there is a financial incentive as described above to get your plan filed by December 20, 2019.

 

PFML Regulations Will Be Final and Effective on July 1, 2019

“The final regulations will be posted on the Department website at mass.gov/pfml on Monday, June 17, 2019. The regulations will be formally published under the title 458 CMR 2.00 DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE.”

 

Matrix observations: And, they’re here! The regulations are key to fully understanding and administering the Massachusetts PFML law. The DFML received many comments and suggestions for final revisions, and we will be studying the changes made from the 03-29-2019 draft. In the interest of getting this article posted timely, we are not including an analysis of the final regulations yet. Watch this blog for another article shortly.

 

Other Provisions of the Amendments to the PFML Law

In addition to the above changes, the newly-passed amendments address some of the concerns expressed by employers and other stakeholders. The effect is to better align the PFML law with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act:

  • Unable to perform: The definition of a serious health condition for which an employee may take medical
    leave has been expanded to require that the condition “makes the covered individual unable to perform the
    functions of the covered individual’s position.” The amendment further explains: “This provision shall be
    construed consistent with the equivalent provision of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993,
    codified at 29 U.S.C. 2612(a)(1)(D).”
  • Former employees: The amendment also explains: “A covered individual who is a former employee shall
    be considered unable to perform the functions of the covered individual’s position if the covered individual
    is unable to perform the functions of the covered individual’s most recent position or other suitable
    employment as that term is defined under [the PFML law].”
  • Medical certification: The required contents of a medical certification to support leave are expanded to
    include:

    • A statement by the health care provider that the covered individual is unable to perform the functions
      of the covered individual’s position;
    • A statement of the medical necessity, if any, for intermittent leave or leave on a reduced leave schedule; and
    • If applicable, the expected duration of the intermittent leave or reduced leave schedule.

Unfortunately, still missing is a requirement to provide an estimate of the frequency and duration of each episode of a condition’s flare-up requiring intermittent leave – an important bit of information to manage intermittent leave effectively.

Similar requirements relating to medical necessity and the duration of intermittent or reduced schedule leave have been added to the certification in support of leave to care for a family member with a serious health condition or covered servicemember.

MATRIX CAN HELP! 

In addition to keeping you abreast of developments through these blog posts, Matrix is taking other steps to assist employers interested in the Massachusetts and Washington private plan options.  These include developing state-specific sample private plans for use by our clients and a guide for our account managers to assist you with the private plan decision and application process.

If your company is interested in the private plan option for Massachusetts or Washington PFML, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.comAnd stay tuned here for more PFML information as it develops!

MASSACHUSETTS ANNOUNCES LIKELY 3-MONTH DELAY IN COLLECTING PFML PREMIUM CONTRIBUTIONS

Posted On June 12, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

June 12, 2019

 

Vast amounts of uncertainty and unanswered questions surround the Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave program.  The law currently provides that employers participating in the plan administered by the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) must start withholding contributions from employee paychecks as of July 1, 2019.

On June 11, Massachusetts Governor Baker and leaders of the Massachusetts house and senate announced an agreement to postpone the start of PFML contributions for 3 months, until October 1, 2019.  The change must be accomplished via an amendment to the PFML statute but all parties are on board to get this done.   This is welcome news for employers as they will have more time to get payroll arrangements perfected, decide whether to apply for an exemption from state coverage with a private plan, and otherwise implement.

The anticipated amendment to the PFML statute may also include technical changes to clarify program design.  Clarifications are expected to include amendments relating to intermittent leave, the definition of “serious health condition,” and closer alignment of the Massachusetts PFML law with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act.  (See aimblog published by the Associated Industries of Massachusetts, which was instrumental in advocating for the delay.)

In order to maintain the level of funding for the program that would be achieved if contributions commenced July 1, the combined employer/employee contribution of 0.63% of an employee’s wages will be increased to 0.75%, or from $872 to $1038 per year for an employee earning the state average weekly wage.  It is not yet known how long this increase will stay in effect.  At present, the law requires the DFML to adjust the contribution rate annually, depending on various economic factors, starting October 1, 2021, effective the next January 1.

Massachusetts PFML Reminders

Massachusetts employees and other covered workers can start receiving paid leave benefits January 1, 2021.  The law provides for annual paid leave up to 20 weeks due to an employee’s serious health condition, 12 weeks for family leave purposes (bonding, caring for a family member with a serious health condition, and military exigencies), and 26 weeks to care for a family member with a service-related illness or injury.  There is a 26-week cap on total annual leave benefits.

Over time we have published several articles on Massachusetts PFML.  You can take a look back at our overall summary and periodic developments by entering “Massachusetts” in the search box of this page.

Other Massachusetts PFML News

If an employer chooses to comply with the PFML through a private plan, the law requires the employer to either post a bond or provide benefits through an approved insurance company.  The DFML expects to publish an approved bond rom and instructions any day now.  Watch this blog and the DFML website for that development.

Also, the DFML is constantly updating its website with new information, so a periodic check-in just to see what’s new is worthwhile.  Of course, we will report any major developments here.

MATRIX CAN HELP! 

In addition to keeping you abreast of developments through these blog posts, Matrix is taking other steps to assist employers interested in the Massachusetts and Washington private plan options.  These include developing a sample private plan for use by our clients and a guide for our account managers to assist you with the private plan decision and application process.

If your company is interested in the private plan option for Massachusetts or Washington PFML, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.comAnd stay tuned here for more PFML information as it develops!

 

GOOD NEWS FOR MASSACHUSETTS EMPLOYERS – A DELAY OF PENDING DEADLINES (AND A WORD ON TAXES)

Posted On May 02, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

May 02, 2019

 

That’s right, yet another Massachusetts paid family and medical leave update! Today’s news will be welcomed by Massachusetts employers, especially those considering whether to adopt a private plan rather than use the state program.  Let’s be honest, though – it’s only good news because it backs off from some of the imminent deadlines that were going to be extremely difficult for employers to meet.

Here are the updates, quoted directly (in italics below) from the DFML announcements available on its website. See our comments and analysis below each DFML update.

Exemption Deadline Extended for Quarter 1
The Department’s current guidance requires that exemptions for private plans must be approved in the quarter prior to the quarter in which they will go into effect. For Quarter 1 only [July-September 2019], however, the deadline to file for a private plan exemption that will be in effect for first quarter contributions for paid family and medical leave has been moved from June 30th to September 20th, 2019. This will allow employers additional time to contemplate private plan options. Going forward, the Department will continue to accept applications on a rolling basis but applications must be approved in the quarter prior to the quarter in which they go into effect.

Please note that contributions to PFML begin on July 1, 2019 and the September 20, 2019 extension of the exemption application deadline only impacts the contribution requirements if the exemption request is approved. If the exemption request is denied the impacted business will be responsible for remitting the full contribution amount from July 1, 2019 forward. Therefore, DFML recommends that businesses in the Commonwealth consult with their tax advisors as to the implications associated with applying for a private plan exemption that may or may not be approved.

Employer Notice to Employees
The deadline for employer notice to employees has been extended from May 31 to June 30, 2019. The notice, which may be provided electronically, must include the opportunity for an employee or self-employed individual to acknowledge receipt or decline to acknowledge receipt of the information.

Please Note: The Department of Family and Medical Leave is continuing to accept comment on draft regulations regarding paid family and medical leave and is planning to host two additional listening sessions in May which will be announced shortly.

What does this mean for employers?

Under the prior rule, if a plan was not approved by June 30, the employer would owe the employer and employee contributions to the Commonwealth for all of the quarter (July-September 2019); and this amount could not be recovered even if a private plan was later approved. Now if your private plan is approved by September 20, 2019, you will not have to pay over the July-September 2019 premium contributions to the Commonwealth but rather can keep those for funding your own private plan benefits payments.

Here is a quick rundown of upcoming dates and obligations:

  • All employers will continue to have reporting obligations for every quarter, including Q1 of the program
    (July-September 2019). The DFML has stated it will issue more reporting guidelines prior to July 1
    so that employers know what data they need to be ready to provide after the close of Q1, probably
    in October 2019.
  • All employers will need to post the required notice for workers in the workplace.  See our prior post
    here for more details
  • Individual notices. All employers will need to send individual notices to every employee and
    contractor and receive an acknowledgement or refusal to acknowledge signed by the worker, but the
    deadline has been moved to June 30, 2019.  More details are available
    here and here.
  • Applications for private plan approval can be filed at any time after April 29, 2019. However, the
    application will need to include a copy of the private plan, a copy of the required bond (see our
    blog post
    here), and if Matrix is applying for your company, a signed authorization for Matrix to
    act on your company’s behalf.

A Word on Taxation Issues

On May 1 the DFML also issued a notice that addresses the taxation question – sort of.  We have received several questions about tax treatment of premiums paid by employees and benefits.  Matrix cannot answer those questions, as we are not tax advisors.  Apparently, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts isn’t either.  Here is their notice:

Tax Information
The tax treatment of PFML contributions for both state and federal purposes is governed by federal tax law. The Commonwealth has requested guidance from the Internal Revenue Service on this question and others related to the tax implications of PFML contributions and benefits. Until IRS guidance is issued, individuals and businesses are urged to consult with their own tax advisors on these questions. Based on its own review of federal rules and following consultation with the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, the Department of Family and Medical Leave anticipates that the IRS will conclude that employee contributions should be withheld from after-tax wages. A definitive rule for proper tax treatment of contributions will be available once IRS guidance is issued.


MATRIX CAN HELP!  In addition to keeping you abreast of developments through these blog posts, Matrix is taking other steps to assist employers interested in the private plan option.  These include developing a sample private plan for use by our clients, and an employer guide to the private plan decision and application process.  If your company is interested in the private plan option for Massachusetts PFML, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.comAnd stay tuned here for more information about Massachusetts PFML as it develops – we’ll bring it to you daily, if necessary!

 

MASSACHUSETTS ANNOUNCES PFML PRIVATE PLAN BOND REQUIREMENTS

Posted On April 30, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

April 30, 2019

 

It seems like just yesterday (it was!) that we reported on significant new information and resources from the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave that were released on Friday.  No sooner was our article posted when more news came from DFML:  Details on the private plan bond requirement.

The new information is quoted below in full, and can be found on the DFML website here.

Bond requirements

In addition to the leave benefits explained below, self-insured plans must include the following bond amounts to be eligible for exemptions.

For every 25 employees covered by a business, DFML requires a bond value of:

    • $19,000 for qualifying family leave plans
    • $51,000 for qualifying medical leave plans
    • $70,000 for qualifying plans for both family and medical

Examples

Family leave plans

    • You have 12 employees and you’re applying for an exemption from family leave.
      Your required bond value is $19,000.
    • You have 85 employees and you’re applying for an exemption from family leave.
      Your required bond value is $57,000.

Medical leave plans

    • You have 12 employees and you’re applying for an exemption from medical leave.
      Your required bond value is $51,000.
    • You have 85 employees and you’re applying for an exemption from medical leave.
      Your required bond value is $153,000.

Both family and medical leave plans

    • You have 12 employees and you’re applying for an exemption from both family and
      medical leave. Your required bond value is $70,000.
    • You have 85 employees and you’re applying for an exemption from both family and
      medical leave. Your required bond value is $210,000.

 

If your company is interested in the private plan option for Massachusetts PFML, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.comAnd stay tuned here for more information about Massachusetts PFML as it develops – we’ll bring it to you daily, if necessary!

HOT OFF THE PRESSES: YET ANOTHER MASS-IVE UPDATE!

Posted On April 29, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

April 29, 2019

 

I had just exhaled after presenting our Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) webinars on April 23-24when the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave unleashed a barrage of new information, guidance, and resources.  You may have heard my plaintive cry, “Make it stop!”

But it hasn’t stopped and so here we are with more updates for you.  If you
missed our webinars, you can get up to speed from our prior blog post,
which includes a link to our webinar deck.

CLICK ON MR. RADAR TO VIEW APRIL 24, 2019 BLOG

Counting workers for the under-25 exemption from employer premiums

Employers using the public plan to provide PFML benefits and with fewer than 25 Massachusetts covered workers are exempt from
paying the employer share of medical leave premiums to the Commonwealth’s trust fund.  If your workforce is near this number,
it is important to know how to count your workers for this exemption. The draft regulations (section xx.05) direct you to count the number of employees on the payroll “during each pay period and dividing by the number of pay periods” but do not state over what period of time to do this averaging.

New materials released by the Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) on Friday now clarify that you consider your number of workers per pay period to get an annual average, based on the prior calendar year for the current calendar year.  And remember, covered workers for this count includes both regular employees and 1099-MISC workers if those contractors constitute more than 50% of your total workforce.

The new posting from the DFML can be found at https://www.mass.gov/info-details/counting-the-covered-individuals-in-your-workforce-under-the-pfml-law.

Private plan exemptions

Also in the new materials released by DFML is an entire page with ancillary materials devoted to the private plan exemption, whereby employers can apply for approval of their own paid medical and/or family leave plan rather than having employee leaves administered by DFML. The new resources include a walk-through of the application process complete with a video demonstration of an online application.  Important points to note:

  • You will need to log on to MassTaxConnect to start the application process. If you don’t already have an account,
    there is a link for registering.
  • After providing basic company and contact information, you will answer a series of yes/no questions.  The
    questions are designed to determine whether your plan is compliant with the PFML requirements.
  • Next is an opportunity to upload any supporting documents.  Interestingly, the tutorial and the online application
    (to the extent I could read it!) does not specifically require a copy of your plan but certainly the plan itself would
    constitute supporting materials.  The application website allows you to upload more than one document so
    if your plan is contained in multiple documents you have the ability to include all. If you are having a TPA
    such as Matrix submit the application for you, a signed statement providing the necessary authority would
    be important to include.
  • After completing your application, you will be notified within 1-2 business days of the status of your plan.  If
    the plan is not approved, you will have a chance to request further review by the DFML.

The new materials can be accessed here:  https://www.mass.gov/info-details/exemptions-from-paid-family-and-medical-leave-for-private-plans

Employer Notices to Employees

With the upcoming employer notice requirements (posters and individual worker notices) came a lot of questions.
To recap:

  • Employers must post a general notice of employee and contractor rights and responsibilities under the PFML
    law in the workplace, meeting certain language requirements.  This posting should be done immediately.
  • Employers must provide individual notices to employees and contract workers in their primary language and
    receive an acknowledgment from each worker by May 31, 2019.  That last part is a new clarification – see
    the discussion below.
  • We provided more detail on these notices in our blog post here, including a link to our webinar deck.

Here’s what we have now learned from the DFML, via a response from the Director to my email questions:

  • The May 31 deadline applies both to giving the notice AND receiving the acknowledgements.  The PFML statute
    doesn’t address employers’ notice obligations to current individual employees, but the DFML has now set the
    May 31 deadline for employers to both provide the notice and receive the acknowledgments (or refusals) from
    existing employees.  This is 30 days in advance of when withholding from worker paychecks will begin on
    July 1 (if the employer is not covering the employee share of PFML premium contributions).
  • That acknowledgement form and the odd refusal to acknowledge. The statute requires employers to provide
    individual notices and an opportunity for workers to either acknowledge receipt of the notice or decline
    to acknowledge receipt in writing.  The DFML does not plan to provide a form for use if the employee refuses
    to acknowledge receipt of the notice.   Here is what came out of my brain to fill this requirement.
    (Note this is my best guess and I cannot promise whether the DFML would find it sufficient):


EMPLOYEE STATEMENT DECLINING TO ACKNOWLEDGE RECEIPT OF NOTICE
I decline to acknowledge receipt of the Employer Notice to Employee relating to my Rights and
Obligations under the Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave Law, M.G.L. c.175M.
I understand my employer will retain a copy of this statement.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Signature

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Print Name

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Date


  • Evidence of Employer Compliance.  The DFML declined to provide any guidance regarding what will constitute
    sufficient evidence that you provided the correct notice and opportunity to acknowledge or decline if the
    employee refuses to do either.  My suggestion is to use a reasonable means that is designed to get actual
    notice to each employee individually.   Consider:

    • Regular mail to the employee’s current home address with a log to substantiate the mailings (as we know,
      recipients often refuse to accept certified delivery)
    • Electronic delivery to the employee’s known functioning email with a means to produce a copy of the email
      sent (again, employees may decline to provide a read receipt)
    • Hand delivery to the employee by someone who keeps a log of date, time, and other facts of each delivery

Don’t just leave a stack of the forms in the lunchroom or tell all employees generally to check it out on your intranet.

  • Individual notice in employee’s primary language.  The DFML says this is a requirement even if it has not yet
    provided a translation in the language you need for an employee.  At the time of our webinars, the notices to
    W-2 employees and 1099-MISC workers were available in 5 languages plus English.  However, as of Friday the
    notices are now available in 13 languages on the DFML website here.
  • Compliance with posting notification for teleworkers.  There is no provision in the PFML statute for electronic
    “posting” as there is for electronic individual notices.  I asked the DFML, could the employer put the poster on its
    intranet accessible to employees, or email it to remote workers?  The DFML agreed these are reasonable
    options. Consistency with your process for other electronic employee notifications would be a good thing as
    long as it is an effective means of giving notice.
  • Changing your decision whether to withhold employee premium contributions from paychecks.  If an
    employer states on the notice form that it will not withhold contributions from employee paychecks, the
    DFML says the employer can change this decision later.  But, plan to provide a new individual notice to
    employees and contractors, including obtaining those acknowledgements or refusals.  Thirty days’ advance
    notice of the change sounds like a good plan to me, although nothing in the law requires that.  And the
    same applies if you initially withhold employee contributions and then decide you will no longer do so.

Matrix is on it!  Stay tuned to this blog for all the news on Massachusetts paid family and medical leave developments other in other states. And when time permits, we’ll cover some non-PFML issues, too!

MORE MASS-IVE DEVELOPMENTS THAT YOU NEED TO KNOW (AND DO) NOW

Posted On April 24, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

April 24, 2019

 

As you well know, employees and employers are responsible for contributions to the Massachusetts Family and Employment Security Trust Fund starting July 1, 2019.  On April 23 and 24, Yours Truly presented webinars on the current status of Massachusetts paid family and medical leave and what you need to know, and do, now to get ready. Short on time? Access the webinar PowerPoint deck by clicking Mr. Radar; it is chock full of timely information and important links to the Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) website resources.  An audio recording of the webinar will be available soon – just watch this blog for a link when it is ready.

 

CLICK MR. RADAR FOR THE WEBINAR CONTENT!

 

 

In the meantime, here are a couple of crucial pointers for your immediate action:

  • The DFML has released forms for the required general notice to workers about the PFML and their rights.
    Post these notices now, in English and in each language which is the primary language for 5 or more
    individuals in your workplace.  DFML has made the poster available in 13 languages.  Access the posters
    on the DFML website
    here.
  • Individual notices. You must send specific notices to employees and contract workers by May 31, 2019,
    in workers’ primary language.  The notices require you to advise your workers of various information,
    including whether you will be withholding the employee share of the premium contributions from their
    paychecks and, if so, in what percentage amounts; and whether you presently have a private plan
    approved by the Commonwealth for the medical leave, family leave, or both.  Then, you must get a
    signed statement from each employee and contract worker either acknowledging receipt of the notice
    or declining to acknowledge receipt.  If the employee refuses to sign either, you must be able to show
    that you actually gave the notice and an opportunity to sign either statement to the employee.
    The DFML has provided the notices in 5 languages so far, that can be downloaded here. 

Check out our webinar deck at the link above for a lot more MA PFML information, including things to consider when deciding whether to adopt a private plan rather than provide the required benefits through the Commonwealth’s program, and a list of action items. 

For more background info on MA PFML you can type “Massachusetts” in the search box of this blog to find all of our previous MA PFML blog posts. 

MASS-IVE DEVELOPMENTS IN PAID FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE LAW

Posted On March 21, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

& Gail Cohen, Esq. - Assistant General Counsel, Employment and Litigation

March 21, 2019

 

Big dates are ahead in Massachusetts relating to its paid family and medical leave program.  The Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) has announced two key developments:

Massachusetts PFML regulations. The second draft of the PFML regulations will be issued on March 29.  You may recall that the first draft was issued on January 23, 2019.  These were a start but many key topics were not addressed.  The DFML conducted over 10 listening sessions around the state, soliciting comments from attendees on the draft regulations.  The DFML also accepted written comments through March 13.

Now the DFML has announced that the next draft of the regulations will be published on March 29, followed by another public comment period. We expect these to be near final due to the extensive outreach the DFML conducted to gather input. Final regulations will be published and effective no later than July 1, 2019.

Private plan applications.  Employers can begin filing private plan applications on April 29, 2019.  The only detail we have been able to find so far is that applications may be filed through MassTaxConnect We have submitted over 20 questions to the DFML to identify information that Matrix and employers will need to know in deciding whether to file for a private plan.  These address application details, approval process and turnaround time, details on the bond requirement, and much more.

Based on our prior communications with key personnel at the DFML, we anticipate that the application process will be more employer-friendly than our experience in Washington.  In fact, there are indications that, unlike Washington State, employers may be able to submit existing plans that meet or exceed the Commonwealth’s requirements rather than designing and submitting a new, Massachusetts-specific plan.

We are currently developing templates for employer-sponsored private plans to satisfy the medical leave benefit, the family leave benefit or both requirements, and will make these available to our Massachusetts clients as soon as they are completely vetted.

Need to catch up? You can read our prior review of the Massachusetts PFML here. Below is a timeline of the Massachusetts PFML journey from inception to launch, as currently represented by DFML.

Matrix has you covered! We’ve been watching for these developments and know employers have many questions that – we are hopeful – will be answered in the next few weeks.  In anticipation, we have scheduled webinars to be held on Tuesday, April 23 and Wednesday, April 24. Both webinars begin at 2:00 PM Eastern time. Click the day you prefer to attend and REGISTER today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

We can help!  At Matrix Absence Management, we administer FMLA, state leaves, the ADA, and related company policies for employers every day, day in and day out.  If you would like more information contact us at ping@matrix.com or through your Account Manager.

MASSACHUSETTS PFML AGAIN – BUT NOT YET

Posted On February 14, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

February 14, 2019

 

In our last blog post about Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave (MA PFML), we boldly announced we would be holding Session 2 of our webinars on the law soon, targeting late February.  Well, it turns out that the draft regulations issued on January 23 by the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) are very preliminary and the end of February is much too soon.  We have very little concrete information at this point so discussing the regulations would be quite speculative.  At the end of this post is a summary of the key provisions of the Massachusetts law itself.  In between, let’s share what we do know.

Status of the regulations:  The DFML is holding listening sessions on the draft regs around the state through February, during which they take questions and comments about the draft but do not answer any questions.  I attended the first listening session in Boston and came away with more questions than I started with!  However, I have the good fortune of meeting telephonically periodically with the state Deputy Attorney General who is leading the effort to draft the regulations, so I have been able to share all of my questions, suggestions, and concerns.  The DFML anticipates final regulations by the end of April, with an interim 2nd draft sometime between now and then. 

Employee and employer contribution rates:  One point that seems to be fairly settled is the contribution rates for PFML premiums, which start July 1, 2019. 

Here’s a rundown of what we know:

  • Total premium for both family and medical leave is 0.63% of employee’s wages up to the Social Security taxable amount ($132,900 in 2019)
  • Of that, 0.52% is for medical leave and 0.11% is for family leave
  • The employee pays all of the premium for family leave
  • The premium for medical leave is paid 40% by employee, 60% by employer
  • The net result is that the employer and employee each pay approximately 50% of the total premium
  • Employers can opt to pay for the employee’s share of premiums for the public plan or, in the case of a private plan, not collect premiums

That 0.52%/0.11% split between medical and family leave premiums is contained in the draft regulations so it’s still subject to possible revisions, but the DFML seems pretty set on those numbers.

Private plans:  Sometimes called voluntary plans in other states, the Massachusetts statute does allow employers to opt out of the state “public” plan and instead comply with the law via a private plan administered by the employer, TPA or insurance carrier.  Here is what we know so far:

A private plan must confer all of the same rights, protections and benefits provided to employees under the PFML law, including but not limited to:

  • Providing family leave to a covered individual for the reasons and for the number of weeks required by the law
  • Allowing family or medical leave to be taken intermittently or on a reduced schedule
  • Providing a wage replacement rate during all family and medical leave of at least the amount required by the law
  • Imposing no additional conditions on the use of family or medical leave beyond those explicitly authorized by the law or regulations
  • Using the same employee eligibility requirements as set by the law, and
  • Providing that the cost to employees covered by a private plan shall not be greater than the cost charged under the state program. 

An employer can choose to provide greater employee rights and benefits than those set by the law – e.g., a higher benefit rate or more weeks of paid leave.

Matrix is on it:  Watch this blog for updated information and dates for the next MA PFML webinar as things develop with state procedures and the regulations.  As we did in Washington, Matrix will prepare a Massachusetts private plan template for use by our clients who engage Matrix as their Massachusetts PFML TPA.  One advantage to working with the state on developing the regulations is that Matrix has been able to suggest regulations that will make having a private plan easier for employers and more beneficial to both employers and employees.

Summary of the PFML law

Here are the basic elements of the MA PFML, subject to elaboration and further development through the regulations:

Effective Date:                 

  • Premium contributions: 07-01-2019.
  • Benefits: Family member SHC: 07-01-2021.
  • All other reasons: 01-01-2021.

Administration:               

  • By state; private plans permitted; insurance permitted.

Employee Eligibility:    

  • Employee has been paid wages in the 4 quarters prior to leave amounting to at least 30 times the weekly benefit rate.
  • Includes former employees if eligibility is met at end of employment and leave commences within 26 weeks

Covered Employer:        

  • All; no minimum number of employees

Job Protection:                

  • Same or equivalent position

Leave Reasons:                

  • Employee’s SHC
  • Family member’s SHC
  • Bonding/parental leave
  • Military exigencies (same as FMLA)
  • Care for ill or injured servicemember

Covered Relationships:

FMLA and MA PFML

  •  Spouse
  •  Child
  • Parent

Additional MA PFML Family Members

  • Domestic partner
  • Parent-in-law (including parent of domestic partner)
  • Grandchild
  • Grandparent
  • Sibling

Duration (12 months):                  

  • Employee’s SHC (medical leave): 20 weeks
  • Family leave (bonding, care for family member, or military exigency): 12 weeks
  • Care for service member: 26 weeks

Maximum in 12-month period:

  • 26 weeks

Leave Calculation Method:         

  • “Benefit Year” — measured forward 52 weeks from the Sunday preceding the first day of the EE’s covered leave

Leave Use Increments:                 

  • No minimum increment
  • Continuous, intermittent, reduced

Funding:                                             

  • Family leave premium fully paid by EE
  • Medical leave paid 40% by EE, 60% by ER
  • Total premium = 0.63% of EE’s wages
  • Cap on wages subject to premium determined by Social Security program limit ($132,900 for 2019)
  • Split between family and medical leave premiums:
  • 52% for medical and 0.11% for family = 0.63%
  • Comes out to about 50/50 split in total between employer/employee

Benefits:                            

  • 80% on portion of employee’s Average Weekly Wages (AWW) equal to or less than 50% of state AWW, plus
  • 50% on portion of employee’s AWW greater than 50% of state AWW
  • State AWW is currently $1107.48 (Dec 2019)

https://ycharts.com/indicators/massachusetts_average_weekly_earnings_of_all_employees_private_service_providing_unadjusted

  • Maximum based on 64% of state AWW
  • Statutory cap of $850/week if 64% of AWW is higher

Voluntary Plans:              

  • Permitted for medical leave and/or family leave
  • Must be approved by state
  • Insurance permitted (but no details in law)

Effect on other laws:     

  • Concurrent with FMLA
  • There is no existing MA family/medical leave law
  • MA Parental Leave still in effect – 8 weeks for bonding

Draft regulations:           

  • Released 01-23-2019 – lots of work to be done yet!

MASSACHUSETTS PFML ROLLS FORWARD – DRAFT REGULATIONS RELEASED!

Posted On January 25, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

& Gail Cohen, Esq. - Assistant General Counsel, Employment and Litigation

January 25, 2019

 

You know you are a compliance geek when the bright spot of your week is the release of new leave law regulations!  Yes, I’m guilty as charged – but I know I’m not alone.  Here’s the scoop:

On January 23 the Massachusetts Department of Family and Medical Leave (DFML) released draft regulations that start to flesh out the how-to’s of the Massachusetts Paid Family & Medical Leave law (PFML).  The regulations can be accessed from a link on the DFML home page.

 

We know you are eager to learn all about MA PFML, the new draft regulations, and what they mean for your business.  That’s why we will be holding webinars soon – presently targeted for February 27 and 28.

For more information and an invitation to the webinars, watch this blog, contact your sales or account manager, or send us an email at ping@matrixcos.com.

 

 

Kudos to the DFML for getting this document out somewhat early.  The MA law doesn’t require draft regulations until March 31 and final regs until July 1, 2019 – very late in the game, considering employer and employee contributions start on July 1.  However, the DFML is cognizant of the challenges employers will face getting ready for this new leave and benefits law so, truly, the sooner the better.  The Department also expects to finalize the regulations prior to that July 1 deadline.

Be aware, however, this version is very likely to change before being finalized.  For that reason, I am not going into much detail here about what the draft regulations contain.  The document itself states in a header on every page, “DRAFT – REGULATIONS UNDER DEVELOPMENT – FOR THE PURPOSE OF EARLY PUBLIC INPUT ONLY – 1/23/19.”

To this end, the DFML has scheduled 7 public listening sessions to gather comments on the draft regulations.   The sessions run from January 30 through February 19 at various locations around the state.  Dates and locations are available on the DFML home page.

At Matrix we are actively involved in keeping current on MA PFML developments, but we are also helping to shape these and similar regulations.  I lead a small group that has periodic conferences directly with the Massachusetts Undersecretary of Labor/General Counsel for the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, who is leading the development of the MA regulations.  In addition I will attend the January 30 listening session in Boston while other Matrix representatives will attend other sessions around the state.

DRAFT REGULATIONS

Much of the content of the draft regulations is a repeat of provisions of the PFML law itself.  There are some details about claims documentation, time limits, and employer reporting obligations.  Much more is needed to define how to apply for and operate a private plan and how to administer claims.  I will be vocal in at the listening session and in my meetings with Commonwealth personnel.

KEY PROVISIONS OF MA PFML

High level, here are the key provisions of the MA PFML law:

Private plans.  Employers can meet their MA PFML obligations through a public plan administered by the Commonwealth or through a private plan for medical and/or family leave that offers benefits at least as beneficial to employees as the state plan.  The law also specifically recognizes that employers can obtain private insurance to cover their benefit obligations under a private plan.

 

Matrix can help!  We anticipate developing a model private plan to meet employers’ MA PFML obligations and assisting in administration once benefits go into effect starting January 1, 2021.  Many details are yet to be developed by the Commonwealth for such plans, so stay tuned.

 

Covered employers.  All employees of any size must comply with the law, although an employer with fewer than 25 employees in the Commonwealth is not required to pay the employer portion of the premiums.

Eligible employees.  An employee is eligible for leave benefits if he or she has been paid wages in the “base period” amounting to at least 30 times the weekly benefit rate.  The base period is the last 4 completed calendar quarters immediately preceding the first day of an individual’s benefit year.  Coverage includes benefits for former employees within 26 weeks of separation and independent contractors if the employee or contractor meets the eligibility requirement.

Funding.  The benefits will be funded at an initial rate of 0.63% of an employee’s average weekly wage (to be adjusted annually):

  • The premium for medical leave (employee’s own serious health condition)
    will be paid 40% by the employee and 60% by the employer
  • The employee pays 100% of the premium for family leave
  • The premium has not yet been apportioned between medical leave and family leave

Premium contributions.  Employers and employees must begin making premium contributions July 1, 2019.  Employers can, of course, choose not to withhold premium from employee paychecks and instead pay the employee share themselves.

Benefit amount.  Weekly benefits are paid based on a percentage of an employee’s wages:

  • Wages equal to or less than 50% of the state average weekly wage (SAWW) will be paid at 80%
  • Any portion of wages in excess of 50% of the SAWW will be paid at 50%
  • Initially, benefits will be capped at $850 per week. Thereafter, benefits are capped at 64% of the SAWW,
    to be adjusted annually.

Paid leave benefits start dates.  Paid leave benefits for all leave reasons except family member serious health condition begin on January 1, 2021.  Paid leave benefits to care for a family member with a serious health condition begin on July 1, 2021.

Leave reasons.  Leave reasons mirror those of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), which will run concurrently if both laws are applicable:

  • Employee’s serious health condition
  • Family member’s serious health condition
  • Bonding with a new child
  • Family military exigencies
  • Care for a seriously ill or injured service member

One difference employers will notice is that the list of family members for whom employees can take leave includes not just the employee’s parent, child, or spouse like FMLA, but also domestic partners, parents-in-law, grandparents, grandchildren, and siblings.  Any MA PFML taken to care for these additional family members will not count toward usage of the employee’s FMLA entitlement.

Leave duration.  Leave durations in a “benefit year” are up to:

  • 20 weeks for medical leave (an employee’s own serious health condition)
  • 12 weeks of family leave (care of a family member with a serious health condition, bonding, or military exigencies)
  • 26 weeks to care for a seriously ill or injured service member
  • An aggregate maximum of 26 weeks in a benefit year for all leave reasons

Benefit year.  All leave entitlements and usage are measured forward 52 weeks from the Sunday preceding the first day of the employee’s covered leave.  (Rolling forward, get it?)

Still geeking out?  Matrix held national webinars last year to help introduce and explain the Massachusetts PFML law.  If you can’t wait until the next round, you can do all your preparation here and be at the very front of the class!

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.

A “GRAND BARGAIN” – MASSACHUSETTS ENACTS PAID MEDICAL AND FAMILY LEAVE

Posted On June 29, 2018  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

& Gail Cohen, Esq. - Assistant General Counsel, Employment and Litigation

June 29, 2018

 

Governor Charlie Baker signed a bill on June 28 making Massachusetts the seventh jurisdiction to enact paid family and medical leave (PFML).  The paid leave provisions are part of a so-called Grand Bargain between the state legislature and voters that was designed to keep several voter initiatives off the November ballot. 

Here are some key provisions:

Funding.  The benefits will be funded at an initial rate of 0.63% of employee’s average weekly wage (to be adjusted annually):

  • The premium for medical leave (employee’s own serious health condition)will be paid 40% by the employee and 60% by the employer
  • The employee pays 100% of the premium for family leave
  • The premium has not (yet) been apportioned between medical leaveand family leave

Premium contributions.  Employers and employees must begin making premium contributions July 1, 2019.

Paid leave benefits available.  Paid leave benefits for all leave reasons except family member serious health condition begin on January 1, 2021.  Paid leave benefits to care for a family member with a serious health condition begin on July 1, 2021.

Leave reasons.  Leave reasons mirror those of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (which will run concurrently in most cases):  Employee’s serious health condition, family member’s serious health condition, bonding with anew child, family military exigencies, and care for a seriously ill or injured service member.

Benefit amount.  Benefits are paid based on a percentage of an employee’s wages, with a cap of $850 weekly.

Leave duration.  Leave durations in a 12-month period are up to:

  • 20 weeks for medical leave (an employee’s own serious health condition)
  • 12 weeks of family leave (care of a family member with a serious health condition, bonding, or military exigencies)
  • 26 weeks to care for a seriously ill or injured service member
  • Aggregate maximum of 26 weeks in a 12-month period for all leave reasons

Voluntary plan.  Employers can meet obligations through the state plan or through a private plan(s) for medical and/or family leave that offer benefits at least as beneficial to employees as the state plan

Matrix will administer this leave law for clients: Watch this space for a more detailed summary of the new law in the next day or two. 

Existing PFML laws.  California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island already have paid family and medical leave laws in effect.  In addition, Washington State’s PFML law will require premium payments starting January 1, 2019, and paid leave benefits starting January 1, 2020.   You can check out our prior summaries about Washington State here and hereWashington D.C. is next in the wings with premium payments starting July 1, 2019, and paid leave benefits starting July 1, 2020.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.

MASSACHUSETTS ENACTS PREGNANT WORKERS FAIRNESS ACT

Posted On July 31, 2017  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

& Gail Cohen, Esq. - Assistant General Counsel, Employment and Litigation

July 31, 2017

 

 

The move toward significant workplace protections for pregnant employees continues state by state.  On July 27, 2017, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed House Bill 3680 establishing the Massachusetts Pregnant Workers Fairness Act.

Massachusetts joins 15 other states and Washington, D.C. with similar protections for pregnant employees.  These laws typically provide protections well beyond existing protections under the Americans with Disabilities Act, in that they do not require the employee to be disabled by the pregnancy in order to receive a reasonable accommodation.

The Massachusetts Act, effective April 1, 2018, provides broad protections for employees and prospective employees who are pregnant or have conditions related to pregnancy.  Key provisions include the following:

Employers cannot deny an employee’s request for a reasonable accommodation due to an employee’s pregnancy or condition related to pregnancy, including lactation or expressing breast milk.

Employers must engage in a timely, good faith, and interactive process to determine effective reasonable accommodations to enable employees to perform the essential functions of their jobs.

Employers can require documentation to support a request for a reasonable accommodation. The Act identifies a broad list of types of health care providers who can supply the documentation, including not just physicians but also a variety of other medical professionals, assistants, and therapists.

Documentation cannot be required for employee requests for: (1) more frequent restroom, food, and water breaks; (2) seating; and (3) limits on lifting over 20 pounds.

The employer can deny an employee’s request if it can show that the accommodation would impose an undue hardship, defined as significant difficulty or expense. Factors to consider include the nature and cost of the requested accommodation, the financial resources, size, and facilities of the employer’s business, and the impact of the requested accommodation on the employer’s expenses, resources, or other impact on the employer’s business.

Employers cannot require an employee to accept an unnecessary accommodation, including a forced leave of absence.

The Act prohibits discrimination and retaliation against a pregnant employee or prospective employee in hiring and in terms and conditions of employment, or for requesting an accommodation.

Employers must provide written notice of employees’ rights under the Act, including the right to reasonable accommodations for conditions related to pregnancy. Required notices include a notice of the rights under the Act in an employee handbook, notice to all new employees upon starting employment, notice to existing employees on or before January 1, 2018, and notice to an employee within 10 days of notification to her employer of her pregnancy and/or her need to express breast milk for a nursing child.

 

MATRIX CAN HELP!  Matrix provides leave, disability, and accommodation management services to employers seeking a comprehensive and compliant solution to these complex employer obligations. We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact us at ping@matrixcos.com.