NEW YORK’S EMERGENCY PAID QUARANTINE LEAVE FOR COVID-19 – AN UPDATE

Posted On April 15, 2020  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

April 15, 2020

 

On March 18, 2020, Governor Cuomo signed emergency legislation guaranteeing job protection and pay for employees>radarNY affected by COVID-19 who are subject to mandatory or precautionary orders of quarantine or isolation. The law was effective immediately.

We originally posted a summary of the New York law on March 19. There are still some open questions and no regulations, but the dust is settling somewhat so we provide this updated post with today’s best information about the New York law. Many thanks to Kimberly Dunn, my colleague at Reliance Standard Life Insurance, for her review and valuable input on this update – keeping me straight and accurate!

Here are the specifics: 

Covered employees. All employees are covered; no eligibility requirements for paid sick leave; regular eligibility requirements for paid family leave and disability benefits.

Covered employers. All employers are covered.

Leave reasons. Despite being called “paid sick leave” the New York law does not provide any paid leave for illness, COVID-related or otherwise. Rather, employers are required to provide paid leave for absences due to a COVID-19-related mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine or isolation issued by the state of New York, the department of health, local board of health, or any governmental entity duly authorized to issue such order due to COVID-19. An order from a medical provider to stay home or in quarantine will not suffice.

Amount and type of benefits: The law provides 3 types of paid leave and benefits. Availability of the benefits depends on employer size (and in some cases, net worth), and whether the employee or a dependent minor child is the subject of the quarantine order. However, benefits are not available if the employee is able to work during the quarantine through remote access or through other means. The type of benefits are:

  • Paid sick leave, paid directly by the employer;
  • Enhanced combination of statutory paid family leave (PFL) and disability benefits; and
  • Regular PFL benefits with an added leave reason relating to quarantines.

Employers with 1-10 employees and net income less than $1m

Employee quarantine:

  • No required paid sick leave
  • Enhanced PFL and disability benefits

Child quarantine:

  • PFL benefits under new quarantine reason

Employers with 1-10 employees and net income greater than $1M

Employers with 11-99 employees

Employee quarantine:

  • 5 calendar days of sick leave paid by employer
  • Enhanced PFL and disability benefits

Child quarantine:

  • PFL benefits under new quarantine reason

Employers with 100 or more employees

Public employers of any size

Employee quarantine:

  • 14 calendar days of sick leave paid by employer
  • No enhanced PFL/disability benefits

Child quarantine:

  • PFL benefits under new quarantine reason
 

Enhanced PFL/disability benefits. After using the mandated paid leave (if any), employees of the smaller employers (1-99 employees) can apply for enhanced New York PFL and disability benefits for the employee’s own order of COVID-19 quarantine (not a child’s order). These enhanced benefits consist of:

  • PFL benefits paid at 60% of wages, up to a maximum of $840.70 per week and
  • Disability benefits paid simultaneously, up to $2,043.92 per week

Total combined maximum weekly benefit of $2,884.62, but capped at 100% of the employee’s actual average weekly wageThere is no waiting period for these enhanced PFL/disability benefits.

Measuring 5 or 14 days. During a covered quarantine leave the employee is entitled to pay for the number of days the employee would normally work in 5 or 14 calendar days. For example, an employee who works for a company with 60 employees is entitled to 5 calendar days of paid leave. If that employee works a regular Monday-Friday work week and starts a quarantine leave on a Thursday, that employee would get 3 days of pay: Thursday, Friday, and Monday.

The order of quarantine. The “mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine” required for the NY COVID paid sick leave and enhanced DBL/PFL benefits must be issued by state of New York, the Department of Health, a local board of health, or any government entity duly authorized to issue such order due to COVID-19.  The order must be “individualized” meaning that it must be directed specifically to the employee or employee’s minor dependent child. Gov. Cuomo’s order for nonessential workers to work from home/shelter in place (“pause”) does NOT qualify.

The employee is responsible for providing the employer with a copy of the order justifying the quarantine leave. New York has published a document Obtaining an Order that gives employees directions on how to obtain the relevant order and what to do if an order is not immediately available.

Some normal PFL and disability rules still apply. Employees entitled to the enhanced PFL/disability benefits must still meet the usual eligibility requirements (employees who work 20 or more hours per week: 26 weeks of work for the employer; employees who work fewer than 20 hours per week: 175 days for work for the employer).

In addition, usage of the enhanced PFL/disability benefits counts toward an employee’s entitlement in a 52-week period (10 weeks of PFL in 2020, 26 weeks of disability, combined total of 26 weeks). What is not yet clear is whether use of the enhanced benefits counts as weeks of both PFL and disability. For example if an employee uses 2 weeks of enhanced PFL/disability benefits, does that count as only 2 weeks of benefits total (and if so, do they count toward PFL or disability usage?) or does that count as 4 weeks of benefits total, 2 weeks of PFL and 2 weeks of disability?

Multiple quarantines. The 5 or 14 days of paid leave is a single entitlement. The employer is not required to provide additional paid leave if the employee exhausts her 5 or 14 days and then experiences a subsequent quarantine event. However, any unused time can be carried over to another quarantine event.

On the other hand, all PFL and/or disability benefits are available up to the limitations for use in a 52-week period, so can be used if an employee or the employee’s child is subject to a covered order of quarantine.

Regular statutory disability and PFL benefits. An employee of a larger employer (100 or more employees) does not get enhanced PFL/disability benefits. The employee can, however, apply for regular disability benefits if he is ill with COVID-19 and meets the definition of “disability” under the statute. Likewise, the employee can apply for regular PFL for any of the usual leave reasons, including to care for a family member with a serious health condition.

Note that public employers of any size are not covered employers for purposes of disability and PFL benefits, so unless an entity has opted into coverage, its employees cannot receive these benefits for any purpose.

Determining employer coverage. Employer size is determined by the number of employees the company had on January 1, 2020. This includes all of the company’s employees, not just those in New York. So, an employer could have 750 employees total and only one employee in New York; that one employee would be entitle to the 14 days of paid sick leave. The company’s net income for employers with 1-10 employees is its 2019 net income.

Other details.

The 5 or 14 days of paid sick leave are in addition to an employee’s other accrued sick leave provided by the employer. The employer cannot require an employee to use other paid leave prior to the new statutory paid sick leave.

The New York paid sick leave will run concurrently with any benefits required by federal law for the same reason (for example, the paid sick leave provided by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act for an employee’s or family member’s order of quarantine). The New York law specifically provides that its benefits are secondary to such federal requirements, so the New York benefits described above serve only as a top-off if needed during an employee’s receipt of federally-required paid leave, up to the limits provide by the New York bill.

Employers of all sizes must provide job-protected leave for the duration of the quarantine, regardless of whether the employee is receiving pay or PFL/disability benefits. Following such leave, the employee must be restored to the position held prior to the quarantine.

In addition to new paid sick/quarantine leave: For PFL leave to care for a family member, the definition of “serious health condition” has been expanded to include specifically a diagnosis of COVID-19. This change is effective for 90 days from March 27, 2020 (until June 25, 2020).

State Website Resources. The state’s new COVID-19 website is quite robust, with lots of information, additional links, and forms: 

Matrix can Help!

Something new happens every day in Coronaville! Stay tuned here for more developments and contact your Matrix or Reliance Standard account manager if you have any questions.

 

WHAT ABOUT ME? THE PLIGHT OF THE 500+ EMPLOYER GROUP

Posted On April 14, 2020  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

April 14, 2020

 

FFCRA

At Matrix and Reliance Standard we receive questions about COVID-19-related issues daily – no, hourly. Since the passage of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), many of these questions have revolved around a big  issue for big(ger) employers: What about companies that have 500 or more employees? These larger employers are not covered by the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSL) or Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFML) provisions of FFCRA. So what does apply and what can/should a large employer do?

Let’s take on that topic now. 

On April 9 Matrix and our sister company Reliance Standard Life Insurance presented a webinar on current
federal and state COVID-19-related legislation. I was joined by my RSL colleagues Karen Joseph and Tim Suchecki. We reviewed:

    • The Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSL) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave
      Expansion Act (EFML), both part of the
      FFCRA
    • State paid leave responses to COVID-19
      (including New York, of course)
    • Benefits and leave scenarios in various states
      that have state-mandated paid family and/or
      paid disability programs

You can obtain a copy of our presentation deck  here, and listen to a recording of the  session here.

My company has more than 500 employees. Does the “regular” FMLA apply to COVID-19?

Yes! The regular FMLA may come into play if an employee or employee’s family member is experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. BUT, the individual’s medical condition still must meet one of the FMLA definitions “serious health condition.A COVID-19 diagnosis, in and of itself, does not do this. Some individuals who have COVID-19 are asymptomatic or have very mild symptoms that will not rise to the level of a serious health condition.

Two specific definitions of serious health condition may be applicable here (29 C.F.R. §§ 113-115):

  • Inpatient care (an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility plus
    any subsequent
    period of incapacity or treatment); or
  • Incapacity of more than 3 consecutive, full calendar days, that also involves 2 or more in-person
    treatments by a health care provider or 1 in-person treatment followed by a regimen of
    continuing care
    .

The FFCRA made no changes whatsoever to the rules and procedures for regular FMLA claims. Despite the difficulty in getting an in-person medical appointment, an employer may still require in-person treatment by a health care provider and a written certification. Employers do have the ability to waive this requirement and accept a certification following a telemedicine appointment or waive the certification requirement altogether. Employers should consult with their legal counsel on whether, in that case, the employer should take the same approach to certification requirements for all serious health conditions, not just COVID-19 claims. Maybe this makes sense, as employees will have an even tougher time get an appointment and medical certification for non-coronavirus health conditions.

All other regular FMLA rules also continue to apply, including employee eligibility, total 12-week entitlement, required employer and employee notices, and so on.

My Company has more than 500 employees. Should we provide EPSL and EFML benefits to our employees?

Employers need to approach this decision with eyes wide open. If an employer with 500 or more employees elects to provide the EPSL and/or EFML benefits to its employees, there are two key things to understand:

  1. EFMLA is available when an employee’s child’s school or daycare has closed, or a day care
    provider is unavailable, due to COVID-19.
    This leave counts toward an employee’s 12-week
    FMLA
    entitlement per 12-month period. For employers with 500+ employees, any time
    taken by an employee that fits the parameters of EFMLA is not FMLA leave and cannot be
    counted toward the employee’s 12
    weeks of FMLA. Doing so could be considered
    interference with the employee’s FMLA rights by charging the employee’s FMLA bank
    with leave that is not covered by the FMLA or EFML.
  2. Paid leave provided to non-covered employees for EPSL or EFML reasons will not qualify for
    the 100% tax credit available for wage and related payments made pursuant to the acts.

With those two factors in mind, employers with 500 or more employees can certainly offer the same type of benefits to its employees as a new company policy or benefit. And, any employer can allow (but often cannot require!) employees to use existing company-paid sick leave, PTO, and other paid leave benefits for COVID-19-related reasons not normally covered, such as quarantines or school closures.

My Company has more than 500 employees. Do we need to post notice of the EPSL and EFML?

No. You are not a covered employer so no need to put up the DOL-approved poster (available here in several languages for those who DO need to post or share electronically!). In fact, posting the notice if your company is not covered might just add confusion to an already confusing situation for employees.

My business is made up of multiple companies, some over and some under 500 employees. Should we provide EPSL and EFML benefits to ALL employees?

The previous question provides the answer here: be aware of the two key factors in making your decision. But there is an additional consideration: If you provide EFML benefits to the employees of the 500+ companies you are in effect giving those employees greater benefits than the employees of smaller companies. That’s because, for the employees of the larger companies, the paid time off cannot count toward the employee’s FMLA 12-week entitlement, but such usage for an employee of a smaller company does count toward FMLA. So the employees of the larger companies may be able to take more leave in a 12-month period, paid or unpaid, than employees of the smaller companies. Be ready for employee dissatisfaction with perceived inequities in benefits among the companies!

My company has ABOUT 500 employees, depending on the day. Should we provide EPSL and EFML benefits to our employees regardless of each day’s headcount?

Whether an employer has fewer than 500 employees is determined as of the first day of leave of EACH employee requesting leave. That means, for example, that an employer with 510 employees today does not have to grant leaves that will start today; but a week later, if the employee headcount drops to 495, the employer does have to grant leaves requested to start that day. (This may include leave for the employees denied today.)

In light of this moving target it may be tempting to simply grant the paid leave for all employees regardless of a specific day’s employee count. But any EPSL or EFML benefits provided while the company has 500 or more employees on the leave start date won’t count toward the employer’s paid leave obligations to an employee for the leaves that ARE covered, won’t qualify for the tax credits, and can’t be counted toward the employee’s FMLA entitlement. Feeling like a broken record here, but there are so many permutations on that 500 rule!

My business is made up of several related entities. Should we provide EPSL and EFML benefits to our employees?

Generally, each legal entity, such as a corporation, is a separate employer for purposes of counting employees for EFMLA (and FMLA) coverage. However, in some cases related entities may constitute a single employer and therefore all employees of the related entities are counted to determine the under/over 500 count.

Here is guidance from the FMLA regulations, which are incorporated into the EFML regulations:

A corporation is a single employer rather than its separate establishments or divisions. Where one corporation has an ownership interest in another corporation, it is a separate employer unless it meets the “integrated employertest. Where this test is met, the employees of all entities making up the integrated employer will be counted in determining employer coverage and employee eligibility. A determination of whether or not separate entities are an integrated employer is not determined by the application of any single criterion, but rather the entire relationship is to be reviewed in its totality. Factors considered in determining whether two or more entities are an integrated employer include:

(i) Common management;

(ii) Interrelation between operations;

(iii) Centralized control of labor relations; and

(iv) Degree of common ownership/financial control.

(29 C.F.R. §§ 825.104 and § 826.40)

This assessment is important because, if your company is part of an integrated employer with a total of 500 or more employees, any benefits provided cannot be counted toward an employee’s FMLA usage and won’t qualify for tax credits, as discussed above. On the other hand, if your under-500 corporate entity is affiliated with other companies but does not satisfy the integrated employer test you may be covered by FFCRA without realizing it.

SAFE BET: If you have questions about whether your company is part of an integrated employer, consult your legal counsel. The determination depends on a legal analysis your company’s specific facts and circumstances.

My company usually has more than 500 employees, but we have had to furlough hundreds and now have fewer than 500 active employees. Are we covered by FFCRA?

Yes. Those remaining active employees are entitled to EPSL or EFML paid benefits and job-protected leave. Employees on furlough or laid off are not counted toward the company’s number of employees. Likewise, they are not entitled to FFCRA benefits. However, furloughed or laid off employees may be entitled to unemployment benefits, which vary from state to state.

My company has more than 500 employees. Are there any other COVID-19-related laws we need to comply with?

Yes. Specifically, New York passed a law, effective March 18, 2020, which provides paid leave to employees of all employers when the employee or a minor dependent child is subject to an order of quarantine or isolation. The type and amount of paid benefits available to employees depends on employer size. Employers with 100 or more employees must provide 14 calendar days of paid leave due to an employee or minor child quarantine (that is, pay for the number of days the employee would normally work in a 14-day period). For details on the New York law, check out our New York FAQs and our webinar presentation  and recording.

In states with paid family leave and/or paid disability benefits, many changes have been made to afford benefits to employees for COVID19-related leaves. These too are covered in our recent COVID-19 webinar.

Matrix can help!  

Look, there are obviously a number of factors in play surrounding the recent COVID-19 laws, particularly as they relate to providing benefits voluntarily to companies with more than 500 employees. It’s a sad, but unavoidable truth that well-meaning employers must nonetheless be cognizant of the unintended consequences that could result without careful examination of ALL the laws that apply to them. We are here to offer information and illumination – that’s our jam! But remember, consulting with legal counsel and a tax expert is always advisable if employers with over 500 employees choose to provide benefits more generous than those required under the law.

NEW YORK ADDS LEAVE LAW FOR VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

Posted On September 30, 2019  

by Marti Cardi, Esq. - Vice President, Product Compliance

September 30, 2019

 

Effective November 18, 2019, New York employers with 4 or more employees must provide reasonable leave to employees who are victims of domestic violence.  With this law New York joins a growing number of jurisdictions that provide job-protected leave of absence and other accommodations to employees who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. 

We previously wrote about these laws here.  

Key provisions of the New York law are summarized below:

Covered employees. “Victim of domestic violence” means:

  • any person over the age of sixteen;
  • any married person; or
  • any parent accompanied by his or her minor child or children

. . . in situations in which such person or such person’s child is a victim of an act which would constitute a criminal act including, but not limited to, acts constituting disorderly conduct, harassment, aggravated harassment, sexual misconduct, forcible touching, sexual abuse, stalking, criminal mischief, menacing, reckless endangerment, kidnapping, assault, attempted assault, attempted murder, criminal obstruction of breathing or blood circulation, or strangulation; AND

  • such act or acts have resulted in actual physical or emotional injury or have created a substantial risk of physical
    or emotional harm to such person or such person’s child;  and
  • such act or acts are or are alleged to have been committed by a family or household member.

View the New York Human Rights Law amendments HERE.

There are no eligibility requirements such as length of employment or hours worked; all employees are covered if they fit the above definition of a victim of domestic violence.

Leave reasons.  Victims may take a reasonable amount of time off for the following reasons:   

  • Seeking medical attention for injuries caused by domestic violence, including for a child who is a victim of
    domestic violence, provided that the employee is not the perpetrator of the domestic violence against
    the child; or
  • Obtaining services from a domestic violence shelter, program, or rape crisis center as a result of domestic
    violence; or
  • Obtaining psychological counseling related to an incident or incidents of domestic violence, including for
    a child who is a victim of domestic violence, provided that the employee is not the perpetrator of the
    domestic violence against the child; or
  • Participating in safety planning and taking other actions to increase safety from future incidents of
    domestic violence, including temporary or permanent relocation; or
  • Obtaining legal services, assisting in the prosecution of the offense, or appearing in court in relation
    to the incident or incidents of domestic violence.

Undue hardship.  An employer may decline a requested leave if the employer can demonstrate that the employee’s absence would impose an undue hardship, based on consideration of factors such as: 

  • The overall size of the business, program or enterprise with respect to the number of employees, number
    and type of facilities, and size of budget; and
  • The type of operation in which the business, program, or enterprise is engaged, including the composition
    and structure of the workforce.

Paid time off and benefits.  The employer can require an employee to use available paid time off during the leave unless otherwise provided for in a collective bargaining agreement or existing employee handbook or policy.  Any absence not covered by such paid time off may be without pay.  The employee is entitled to continuation of any health insurance coverage provided by the employer on the same terms as available during other similar absences. 

Employee notice and documentation.  An employee taking leave pursuant to the law must provide the employer with “reasonable” advance notice unless that is not feasible under the circumstances.  The law does not identify how much advance notice is reasonable, but presumably that is determined by the situation, such as when the employee learned of the need for time off. 

Oddly, the employer can request documentation of the leave reason only if advance notice was not feasible.  In that case, upon request by the employer, such documentation must be provided within a reasonable time after the absence and may include:

  • A police report indicating that the employee or his or her child was a victim of domestic violence;
  • A court order protecting or separating the employee or his or her child from the perpetrator of an act of
    domestic violence;
  • Other evidence from the court or prosecuting attorney that the employee appeared in court; or
  • Documentation from a medical professional, domestic violence advocate, health care provider, or
    counselor that the employee or his or her child was undergoing counseling or treatment for physical
    or mental injuries or abuse resulting in victimization from an act of domestic violence.

Other provisions.

Employers have a duty to maintain confidentiality of information received about an employee’s status as a victim of domestic violence.

If an employee becomes disabled as a result of domestic violence, the employer must treat the employee the same as an employee with any other disability under New York law, including provisions that make discrimination and refusal to provide reasonable accommodation of disability unlawful discriminatory practices. (Of course, the federal Americans with Disabilities Act would also apply.)

The law also prohibits employers from discriminating against an employee or applicant because of the individual’s status as a victim of domestic violence such as by refusing to hire or discharging the individual; and prohibits employers from inquiring about an individual’s status as a victim of domestic violence except in relation to a requested leave. 

MATRIX CAN HELP!   At Matrix we administer these domestic violence and sexual assault laws.  We call them “Personal Protected Leave” to preserve the employee’s (and/or victim’s) privacy.  In addition to those jurisdictions listed in our prior blog post here, another recent addition to these laws is that of Puerto Rico.  We monitor the many leave laws being passed around the country and specialize in understanding how they work together. For leave management and accommodation assistance, contact your Matrix/Reliance Standard account manager now, or send us a message at ping@matrixcos.com.

NEW YORK ADDS ORGAN DONATION TO STATE PAID FAMILY LEAVE REASONS

Posted On November 12, 2018  

November 12, 2018

 

Last month we addressed some leave of absence bills pending in various state legislatures.  New York’s governor has signed one of these bills into law, adding organ and tissue donation to the definition of “serious health condition” under the New York Paid Family Leave law (NY PFL).

Specifically, a serious health condition will now include “transplantation preparation and recovery from surgery related to organ or tissue donation.”  NY PFL only applies to leave to care for a family member with a serious health condition and other family leave reasons, so this will not affect employees’ own disability leaves. The law does not make any additional changes to the NY PFL, but it does include a prohibition against discrimination in the provision of life, accident, health, and long term care insurance based on the status of an insured as a living organ or tissue donor.

Definitions of “organ” and “tissue” are incorporated from the NY Public Health Law as follows:

4. “Organ” means a human kidney, heart, heart valve, lung, pancreas, liver or any other organ designated by the commissioner in regulation in consultation with the transplant council.

10. “Tissue” means a human eye, skin, bone, bone marrow, heart valve, spermatozoon, ova, artery, vein, tendon, ligament, pituitary gland or a fluid other than blood or a blood derivative.

What impact will this law have on family care leaves under NY PFL? Perhaps very little. Under NY PFL an employee is already entitled to take paid time off to care for certain family members with a serious health condition. This term is defined to include an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves:

(1) inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential health care facility; or

(2) three days of incapacity due to a medical condition and continuing treatment or supervision by a health care provider

It is hard to imagine a situation where an employee’s family member is an organ or tissue donor that doesn’t already satisfy one or both of these definitions of serious health condition.   As a result, there is not likely to be much, if any, increase in use of NY PFL to care for a family member due to this new law.

The text of the law can be accessed through a link on this page.   The new law goes into effect on February 3, 2019.

 

Matrix Can Help!

At Matrix we monitor state and federal legislative developments daily and report on any new or advancing leave- and accommodation-related laws to keep our clients and other business partners up to date.  If you ever have questions about leave and accommodation laws – current or just introduced! – please contact your account manager or send an email to ping@matrixcos.com.

STATE LEAVE LAW UPDATES – WHAT’S HAPPENING IN YOUR NECK OF THE WOODS?

Posted On October 22, 2018  

October 22, 2018

 

California – New leave reason under paid family leave

California’s paid family leave law (CA PFL) provides up to 6 weeks of paid (but not job protected) leave of absence for family reasons. Current bases for which an employee can receive paid benefits include caring for a family member with a serious health condition and bonding with a new child.  Recently the California legislature passed, and the Governor signed, a bill adding military exigencies as a leave reason for which an employee can receive paid leave.  The events for which military exigency leave can be taken are the same as under FMLA, when the need is related to the military member’s active duty or call to active duty: 

  • Matters related to short-notice deployment
  • Military events and related activities
  • Childcare and school activities
  • Financial and legal arrangements
  • Counseling (other than from a health care provider)
  • Rest and recuperation
  • Post-deployment activities
  • Care for the parent of the military member
  • Additional activities agreed to by the employer and employee

The new law will be effective January 1, 2021; not clear why the big delay! The law does not expand the total paid leave time available to employees under CA PFL, nor does it provide job protection for this leave. Eligible employees will continue to have job-protected military exigency leave for up to 12 weeks under FMLA, which will run concurrently if the leave is taken for a reason covered by both laws.  However, military exigency leave is not provided by the California Family Rights Act (CFRA).

 

Pennsylvania – Expanding FMLA-like leave rights to care for more family members

The Pennsylvania legislature has revived a bill first introduced in 2017 that, if enacted, would provide FMLA-like leave based on additional family relationships and leave reasons.  Senate Bill 479  seeks to add siblings, grandparents, and grandchildren as family members for whom an employee can take job-protected leave, but only in very limited circumstances. The state bill incorporates some of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act’s provisions, such as employee eligibility rules and the definitions of employee and employer.

The additional family relationships for which leave would be provided are:

  • Grandparent: a biological or adoptive grandfather or grandmother or step-grandfather or step-grandmother
  • Grandchild: a biological or adoptive grandson or granddaughter or step-grandson or step-granddaughter
  • Sibling: a biological or adoptive brother or sister or stepbrother or stepsister

But, leave can be taken for these family members ONLY if the grandparent, grandchild, or sibling:

  • Has a certified terminal illness AND
  • Does not have a living spouse, child over 17 years of age or parent under 65 years of age

The bill, if passed, will provide 6 weeks of leave in a 12-month period that must be taken in minimum increments of one week. The leave will not run concurrently with FMLA because the new family relationships are not covered by FMLA. Conversely, however, FMLA leave taken will reduce an employee’s leave entitlement under the state statute.  How that provision will work is not entirely clear, but presumably the state is trying to provide leave for additional reasons without increasing an employee’s total leave entitlement in a 12-month period to more than the 12 weeks provided by the FMLA.

The bill also contains employee notice and certification provisions.

 

New York – Lingering attempts to expand leave reasons under the Paid Family Leave Act

New York’s Paid Family Leave Act (NY PFL), which went into effect on January 1, 2018, currently provides paid leave for bonding, caring for a family member with a serious health condition, and military exigencies related to a family member’s active duty deployment.  Benefits in 2018 are 8 weeks of leave paid at 50% of the employee’s average weekly wage (subject to a cap).  Those will increase to 10 weeks at 55% in 2019.  We provided a summary of the changes in this prior post.  For a refresher on NY PFL and other recent developments, check out our earlier posts on this blog by searching “New York.”  For more information, the official state website is here.

Several bills are currently pending in the New York legislative process for possible expansion of available leave reasons.  Here is a summary of the most pertinent.

Bereavement.   New York Senate Bill 8380A has passed both houses of the New York legislature and is awaiting (since June!) the governor’s signature or veto.  If passed, the bill adds bereavement due to the death of a family member as a leave reason for NY PFL.  Opponents of the bill point out that there is no time limit on usage of bereavement leave in relation to the date of the family member’s death, no limit on how much time can be used, and no limit on usage increments – so the employee can use bereavement leave in one-day increments as with other leaves under NY PFL.

Organ & tissue donation.  New York Senate Bill 2496 is also awaiting the governor’s signature. If signed, this bill will amend NY PFL to add “transplantation preparation and recovery from surgery related to organ or tissue donation” to the definition of serious health condition.  The bill does not make any additional changes to the NY PFL, but it does include a prohibition against discrimination in the provision of life, accident, health, and long term care insurance based on the status of an insured as a living organ or tissue donor.

Domestic violence.  Also pending, but farther back in the legislative process, is Senate Bill No 7723 that would add matters related to domestic violence as reasons for which an employee can take NY PFL.  Types of activities covered include getting medical attention, attending counseling sessions, seeking legal assistance, attendance in court proceedings, communicating with an attorney, relocating to a permanent or temporary residence.  The bill limits the amount of paid leave available for these reasons to 2 weeks, plus an additional 2 weeks of unpaid leave.  This bill has not made any headway in the legislature since early this year, but is still alive.  We previously provided details about this problematic bill here.

Matrix Can Help!

At Matrix we monitor state and federal legislative developments daily and report on any new or advancing leave- and accommodation-related laws to keep our clients and other business partners up to date.  If you ever have questions about leave and accommodation laws – current or just introduced! – please contact your account manager or send an email to ping@matrixcos.com.